The Enfield Poltergeist: Terrifying photos of “real” haunting

Daisy Phillipson
Still from The Enfield Poltergeist on Apple TV+Apple TV+

If you’re pondering what to watch this Halloween, look no further than Apple TV’s new documentary series The Enfield Poltergeist. The true story behind it is scarier than any horror movie – here are the terrifying photos of the “real” haunting. 

Apple TV+ is getting Halloween in full swing with the release of The Enfield Poltergeist, a four-part documentary series about one of the most famous and controversial poltergeist cases in the world. Taking place between 1977 and 1979 in Enfield, North London, the Hodgson family, consisting of single mother Peggy and her four children, claimed to have been subject to paranormal activity at their council home.

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The most notable and disturbing events centered on the two younger sisters, Margaret and Janet, aged 13 and 11 at the time. The family and investigators alleged the activity started with knocking sounds and furniture moving on its own before eventually the girls claimed to have been physically attacked by the entity. Some of the most chilling footage shows Janet going into trances and speaking in a deep, raspy voice. 

But the reason the word “real” is in quotation marks is because the case proves divisive to this day. While some believe they were haunted by a poltergeist, others think Janet embodied some sort of kinetic energy, and then there are those who think the whole thing was a scam. All of this is explored in the documentary and more – including a series of photos from arguably the UK’s most famous ghost story.

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The Enfield Poltergeist: Terrifying photos of “real” haunting

Using a series of cameras set up to a cable, Graham Morris – who was in his 20s at the time and spent months investigating the hauntings – was able to capture what he and many believe to be images of the poltergeist flinging Janet from her bed and causing the girl great distress:

Photo from The Enfield PoltergeistApple TV+
Still from The Enfield PoltergeistApple TV+
Still from The Enfield PoltergeistApple TV+

As the alleged paranormal activities ramped up at the Hodgson home, a series of investigators expanded their surveillance. Among those involved, whose recordings are played and reenacted throughout The Enfield Poltergeist docu-series, are inventor Maurice Grosse (seen in the third photo) and writer Guy Lyon Playfair of the Society for Psychical Research.

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Following their experiences, they believed that the incidents were authentic, as does Morris, who is interviewed throughout the documentary. He explains that the entity appeared to be “one step ahead” of them, and so he decided to set up a 25-meter cable attached to a series of cameras in the bedroom so that he could control them remotely. 

Alongside this was a live feed of the tape recorder in the bedroom. One night, after hearing a loud noise and a scream, he hit the button and took a series of pictures. The most famous is the first image above, showing Janet almost levitating in the air. 

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“It was only by processing these the following day that we got to realize the true extent of what was happening, where she was actually flying across the room and crashing down just inside the door,” he explains. “You can see that Janet has come from being in the bed, covered up to upright.”

He later adds: “As to what it is, I’ve absolutely no idea – just have to let the pictures speak for themselves.”

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The Enfield Haunting streams on Apple TV+ from October 27. You can check out more of our Halloween coverage below: 

About The Author

Daisy is a Senior TV and Movies Writer at Dexerto. She's a lover of all things macabre, whether that be horror, crime, psychological thrillers or all of the above. After graduating with a Masters in Magazine Journalism, she's gone on to write for Digital Spy, LADbible and Little White Lies. You can contact her on daisy.phillipson@dexerto.com