Top 10 found-footage horror movies ever made

Lucy-Jo Finnighan
Stills from The Blair Witch Project and The Taking of Deborah LoganArtisan/Millennium

Now that Halloween is here, we’ve put together a list of the 10 best found-footage horror movies ever made. You’ll be too scared to close your eyes, and too afraid to open them.

It’s almost Halloween, meaning that it’s the perfect time for a horror movie. Though nowadays, with tons of media shoved in our faces every second, it can sometimes be hard to really get sucked into a movie and its terrors.

Article continues after ad

That’s why genres such as found-footage can be such effective tools of horror, as having more naturalistic camera framing and actors can help make the scares feel all the more real.

But considering there are so many – and that some are better than others – you might be wondering which found-footage flicks are the best. Well look no further, as we’ve ranked the top 10 here, and we’ve also let you know where you can watch them.

Article continues after ad

10. Deadstream (2022)

Synopsis: A disgraced internet personality tries to win back his followers by livestreaming himself at an abandoned haunted house. When he accidentally unleashes a vengeful spirit, his comeback event becomes a fight for his life.

What we think: As the newest film on this list, Deadstream has many hard acts to follow, but with its concerning protagonist, it still manages to stand out. With the rise of live-streamers, found-footage has a whole new tool of horror at its disposal, and Deadstream takes full advantage of that.

Article continues after ad

Where to watch: AMC+

9. Creep (2015)

Synopsis: Aaron answers an online ad and drives to a stranger’s house to film him for the day. The man wants to make a movie for his unborn child, but his requests become more bizarre as the day goes along.

What we think: Creep uses found-footage in a simple, yet very effective way. While the genre usually relies on supernatural spooks, Creep solely takes its tension out of its lead actors and their performances. Furthermore, it is arguably the most realistic of these movies, as its plot is something that could very much happen in real life.

Article continues after ad

Where to watch: Netflix

8. V/H/S/94 (2021)

Synopsis: A mysterious VHS tape reveals a sinister cult that has pre-recorded material that uncovers a horrifying conspiracy.

What we think: V/H/S may be divisive franchise, but most agree that this movie is the best one. Acting as an anthology flick once more, this installment creates five new compelling stories, while also having a great overarching narrative. Plus, the scares are super imaginative.

Where to watch: AMC+

7. Paranormal Activity (2007)

Synopsis: Soon after moving into a suburban tract home, Katie and Micah become increasingly disturbed by what appears to be a supernatural presence. Hoping to capture evidence of it on film, they set up video cameras in the house but are not prepared for the terrifying events that follow.

Article continues after ad

What we think: Paranormal Activity is definitely one of the better-known of its genre, and for good reason. Part of the marketing was showcasing just how scary it was, and makes the movie stand out is its use of stationary cameras, meaning that audiences had to sit still in suspense the whole time before something terrifying pops out at them.

Where to watch: Amazon Prime Video

6. Cloverfield (2012)

Synopsis: As a group of New Yorkers enjoy a going-away party, little do they know that they will soon face the most terrifying night of their lives. A creature the size of a skyscraper descends upon the city, leaving death and destruction in its wake. Using a handheld video camera, the friends record their struggle to survive as New York crumbles around them.

Article continues after ad

What we think: While some may consider this movie more sci-fi than horror, the monster – and its monstrous kills – are definitely scary enough. This creature feature made a major splash, and like other horror movies we’ll be covering on this list, it took full advantage of its found-footage form, with the marketing seeming as naturalistic and simple as possible.

Where to watch: AMC+

Sign up to Dexerto for free and receive:
Fewer Ads|Dark Mode|Deals in Gaming, TV and Movies, and Tech

5. The Taking of Deborah Logan (2014)

Synopsis: Mia records the daily lives of Deborah and her daughter Sarah as part of her thesis. As the days progress, strange things happen around Deborah, and it becomes apparent something has taken control of her.

Article continues after ad

What we think: Scary old people is nothing new, but this movie takes it to another level, and performs its old tricks as if they were new. Sometimes the characters can act stupid simply because the plot needs them to, but the performers act very well, and the movie has grown a large fanbase for a reason.

Where to watch: Tubi

4. Creep 2 (2017)

Synopsis: A video artist who craves shocking stories realises she has made a mistake when she meets a serial killer in a cabin.

Article continues after ad

What we think: One of those rare horror sequels that’s better than the original, Creep 2 ups the ante in all the right ways. It follows the original similarly enough while switching up some aspects to keep things feeling fresh. And with two great unhinged performances, this movie is a great character study.

Where to watch: Netflix

3. REC (2007)

Synopsis: Late-night TV host Angela and her cinematographer are following the fire service on a call to an apartment building, but the Spanish police seal off the building after an old woman is infected by a virus which gives her inhuman strength.

Article continues after ad

What we think: REC came out the same year as Paranormal Activity, and should have received just as much of the fame. With a claustrophobic setting, kick-ass final girl, and seriously scary monsters, this movie takes full advantage of the genre.

Where to watch: Amazon Prime Video

2. Lake Mungo (2008)

Synopsis: Alice drowns while swimming and her family begins experiencing inexplicable events in their home. The family hires a parapsychologist whose investigation unveils Alice’s secret double life and leads them all to Lake Mungo.

Article continues after ad

What we think: Lake Mungo is perhaps one of the most unsettling movies you’ll ever see. Part found-footage and part mockumentary, the twists and turns that this film takes proves that the scares are never over. Surprisingly, this movie also captures the process of grief very well, so be prepared to get emotional.

Where to watch: Tubi

1. The Blair Witch Project (1999)

Synopsis: Found video footage tells the tale of three film students who’ve traveled to a small town to collect documentary footage about the Blair Witch, a legendary local murderer. Over the course of several days, the students interview townspeople and gather clues to support the tale’s veracity. But the project takes a frightening turn when the students lose their way in the woods and begin hearing horrific noises.

Article continues after ad

What we think: While some may not consider this film to be the best of its genre, there’s no doubt the form wouldn’t be what it is today without this movie. And what makes The Blair Witch stand out is how well it was able to sell the concept of found-footage. Marketed as a true story to such an extent that an actors mother was sent condolences cards, The Blair Witch Project proved that audiences could still be spooked once the movie was over.

Where to watch: Paramount+

Article continues after ad

Most of these movies can also be bought or rented digitally on Amazon Prime, which you can sign up for here.

For more horror movie coverage, head here, or check out the below links:

Please note that if you click on a product link on this page we may earn a small affiliate commission.

Related Topics

About The Author

Lucy-Jo is a Movies and TV Writer at Dexerto, and has previously written for Screen Rant and Girls on Tops. After earning a Master's Degree in Film and Literature, Lucy-Jo now loves covering films, TV shows, and anime, especially if it's something by Mike Flanagan, or anything drenched in camp. You can contact her at lucyjo.finnighan@dexerto.com