Psyonix responds to Rocket League Season 1 Tournament Challenge concerns - Dexerto
Rocket League

Psyonix responds to Rocket League Season 1 Tournament Challenge concerns

Published: 12/Nov/2020 0:42

by Alex Tsiaoussidis

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Rocket League Season 1 is underway, but many players felt like Tournament Challenges were too difficult. Fortunately, Psyonix responded quickly and made them easier.

Rocket League has developed in leaps and bounds since it’s release back in 2015. The player-base has increased exponentially since the game became free-to-play, and the competitive scene is alive and well.

Rocket League’s fun and unique gameplay are what draws players in. However, Psyonix has always been pro-active and implemented player feedback into the game, which keeps them coming back.

Rocket League Season 1 Tournament Challenges
Psyonix
It’s hard to find a game that mixes genres as well as Rocket League.

Still, that process has to start somewhere, and it often happens when enough players voice their opinions on social media. In recent weeks, Psyonix has been rocked with a wave of concerns about two Rocket League Season 1 Tournament Challenges. 

The first one is the Stage 2 Challenge ‘Make It To The Quarter Finals In 4 Psyonix Scheduled Tournaments’. The consensus was that this was too difficult, at least for most casual players.

“Can we talk about the Season Challenges Stage 2 task which requires us to make it to Quarter Finals 4 times?” wrote one player. “I think it’s not okay to tie this to performance and making it to quarterfinals.” 

“This ruins the fun for me, and since it’s a free challenge, we NEED to perform it,” he added. It was one of several threads on the issue. However, it was upvoted more than 150 times and sparked a discussion with 100 comments.

Rocket League Season 1 Tournament Challenges
Psyonix
Rocket League tournaments are arguably the game’s most intense mode.

The second one is the Stage 3 Challenge ‘Get 200 Assists in Online Matches.’ Again, players felt like this was too difficult to achieve. But this time, it was more about how long it took to do.

“I don’t think it’s possible for me to get 200 assists,” said one player, who called for a petition to remove it. “It took me half the season to get 40. I’m sure [there are] people also in the same boat. I guess I just think it’s [a] ridiculous number to hit in half a season.”

Rocket League Season 1 Tournament Challenges
Psyonix
Assists in Rocket League are almost as important as goals.

Fortunately, Psyonix heard and have already responded. “After seeing your feedback over the last few weeks about some of the Season 1 Challenges, we’ve decided to make two changes,” they said.

The first challenge has now been changed to ‘Play in 4 Psyonix Scheduled Tournaments.’ This means players only need to compete in four tournaments rather than make four quarter-finals.

The second challenge has also been changed to ‘Get 50 Assists in Online Matches.’ That means the number of assists has been decreased from 200 down to 50, which takes a quarter of the time to do.

Rocket League Season 1 Tournament Challenges
Psyonix
Psyonix have already made two of the Rocket League Season 1 Challenges easier.

“These changes are live now,” they said. “If you don’t see them live in your game just yet, please restart and they should appear as intended.”

Rocket League players are thrilled with the changes. But perhaps more importantly, they’re content knowing that Psyonix always seems to have their back in the end, although it can take a bit of time.

Valorant

C9 Relyks discovers “much bigger issue” than Valorant’s running sprays

Published: 26/Nov/2020 2:19 Updated: 26/Nov/2020 2:28

by Alan Bernal

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Cloud9’s Skyler ‘Relyks’ Weaver found a much bigger problem in Valorant than the running sprays teammate Tyson ‘TenZ’ Ngo tested with the Phantom, once again putting Riot’s shooting-while-moving mechanics under scrutiny.

The Counter-Strike-turned-Valorant pro was looking to explore the running accuracy in the game, but in his testing, found that the 0.50 patch to deadzone change back in May has a much more consequential effect on aim.

Riot describes the deadzone as a “full accuracy state” when moving at or below 30% movement since the May patch before Valorant’s official launch.

Coupling that with counter-strafing, Relyks found that his aim was relatively on target throughout an entire Vandal clip while constantly staying in motion in what he calls a “much bigger issue” than the Phantom’s running sprays.

aim valorant vandal
Riot Games
Counter-strafing in the opposite direction yields better shots in Valorant than coming to a complete stop, according to Relyks.

“One thing (the deadzone change) allows you to do is to strafe back-and-forth while spraying and, as long as you’re strafing in a confined area while keeping yourself at 30% or less of the max movement speed, you can retain relative accuracy,” he said.

He showed how weapons can be “extremely accurate” while staying in motion as long as the player maintains a consistent counter-strafe to stay in the deadzone.

Unfortunately, this isn’t the worst part of Valorant’s mechanics, according to Relyks. He also found that shooting “after you begin moving to the opposite direction (is better) than firing when you come to a complete stop.”

This would give people the opportunity to get off a much better shot while counter-strafing back into cover instead of coming to a halt to line up the perfect shot.

(Mobile viewers: Timestamp at 5:13)

He’s found success with this method on the Vandal, though indicated the Phantom can be much more effective due to its tighter bullet spread.

If this is an intended mechanic in Valorant, it could be that Riot is trying to make the game much more accessible to newer FPS players, though it would lower the game’s overall skill ceiling, according to Relyks.

Since Riot hasn’t touched the deadzone accuracy in months, this could be something the devs looks to rework if it starts getting out of hand in Valorant.