Seth Rogen & Edward Snowden flame mom for burning kid's Pokemon cards - Dexerto
Pokemon

Seth Rogen & Edward Snowden flame mom for burning kid’s Pokemon cards

Published: 15/Oct/2021 23:35 Updated: 15/Oct/2021 23:39

by David Purcell

Share


Pokemon cards are more popular than ever and can be extremely valuable if you pull the right ones from packs, but this mom burns them whenever her children misbehave – and it’s not gone down well with the community. 

The idea of burning valuable cards is not a pretty one, but for much of the younger audience, it’s not about the money. It’s their favorite cards bundled together in a binder, or as part of their collection.

Knowing just how much they enjoy playing with them, though, one mother has gone viral on social media – revealing one of her techniques to get her kid to behave well.

Advertisement

She burns the cards in front of them.

Mom burns Pokemon cards to punish her kid

most expensive pokemon cards
The Pokemon Company
The Pokemon Trading Card game is as popular today as it’s ever been.

The Twitter post has gone viral, after a number of high-profile people discovered its existence and responded.

Among those is Canadian actor Seth Rogen, former computer intelligence consultant Edward Snowden, and others.

The tweet from Liz Mair has racked up over 6,000 quote tweets so far.

It’s fair to say that the reactions from Pokemon trainers and fans alike have been far from welcoming, as well.

Seth Rogen responds

Rogen said: “Save the valuable ones so they can pay for therapy when they’re older.”

Edward Snowden

The next big comment came in from Edward Snowden, who replied: “Every day we stray further from God” and in another tweet, added: “This is a violation of the non-aggressive principle.”

Advertisement

Pokemon fans react on Twitter

Alongside these were a binder’s worth of angry comments from fans of the Pokemon Trading Card Game, with one describing it as “absolutely cruel” and another claiming it’s “terrifying” as well as “abusive” behavior.

It’s fair to say that this method for ‘getting a child to behave’ has been poorly received on social media.

Whether or not the post will be deleted in the future, or more context provided from Liz Mair in further posts, remains to be seen.