League of Legends

Doublelift explains how TSM’s “bad” SwordArt negotiations made him retire

Published: 2/Dec/2020 1:24 Updated: 2/Dec/2020 1:43

by Alan Bernal

Share


League of Legends star Yiliang ‘Doublelift’ Peng revealed more about the strained timeline of Team SoloMid’s negotiations with Hu ‘SwordArt’ Shuo-Chieh, which ultimately led the North American veteran to retire.

Doublelift went into the off-season with a single objective for TSM: sign an elite support who spoke English. SwordArt just got done with a stellar season lifting his team to win the LPL 2020 Regional Finals and getting second place at Worlds.

The TSM veteran also recommended Team Flash’s Nguyễn ‘Palette’ Hải Trung as a suitable support for TSM. However, DL really wanted to play with a bot-lane partner that spoke his native English; a requirement Palette didn’t fulfill, but SwordArt did.

TSM were looking forward to staving off Doublelift’s retirement by making a deal with SwordArt. However, TSM later told their star ADC that negotiations were shaky, and asked if he would be okay with Palette instead. He wasn’t.

On November 25th, Doublelift retired. On November 26th, TSM announced they had successfully signed SwordArt from Suning on a two-year deal that would pay him an LCS-high of $3 million per season.

“No, I didn’t know SwordArt was coming before I retired,” Doublelift said, before explaining how rough transfer discussions made him lean into retirement. “I was really excited for the whole SwordArt thing. They told me SwordArt was confirmed, and I got really excited

“And then I guess the negotiations were going really bad at certain points. So then they told me: ‘Actually, (the deal with SwordArt) fell through. It’s not going to work. Would you still be committed if your support was Palette?’”

Although impressed with Palette, DL was really keen on getting the bot-lane synergy rolling with someone he could effectively communicate with.

At this point, SwordArt was the unobtainable lynchpin in keeping Doublelift from retirement.

But it wasn’t until a day after Doublelift, 27, decided to retire, after production had wrapped on his retirement video, and after TSM were already moving past the seasoned ADC, that the org announced the new support.

“The whole situation made me realize: I’m better off retired,” Doublelift said.

League of Legends

LIVE: LCS Lock In 2021 Day 1: Perkz’s debut for Cloud9 goes awry

Published: 15/Jan/2021 23:00 Updated: 16/Jan/2021 2:52

by Andrew Amos

Share


The LCS has kicked off 2021 not with the Spring Split, but with a new tournament called Lock In. Similar to the KeSPA Cup or Demacia Cup, NA’s top teams will duke it out in a pre-season event right before the main season. Here’s what you need to know.


  • 100 Thieves, Liquid, Evil Geniuses, Dignitas open up LCS Lock In with wins.
  • Perkz’s Cloud9 debut goes awry with 4/7/2 statline on Yone.
  • Golden Guardians vs CLG next at 7pm PT / 10pm ET.

LCS Lock In: Stream

The LCS Lock In tournament is the 2021 starter for League of Legends in North America. All 10 LCS teams will take part in the two-week competition that gives fans a taster of the year to come.

They’re not playing for pittance either. The winning team will take home $150,000 USD, and a lot of confidence heading into the start of Spring 2021 in February.

LCS Lock In 2021: Teams & groups

As we mentioned earlier, all 10 of the LCS teams will be taking part in the Lock In tournament. Some teams may choose to field their academy rosters instead of their main rosters, but with $150,000 on the line, there’ll definitely be some teams gunning for the flag.

Among them, Summer 2020 champions TSM would be favorites. Having made a number of moves in the off-season, only keeping jungler Mingyi ‘Spica’ Lu, the new squad will have a hard task in front of them. Team Liquid, CLG, and Cloud9 also made some big moves in the off-season to catch back up.

The 10 teams will be split into groups of two, with the top four from each group making it to the single-elimination playoffs.

Group A Group B
TSM FlyQuest
100 Thieves Cloud9
CLG Dignitas
Golden Guardians Evil Geniuses
Team Liquid Immortals

LCS Lock In 2021: Schedule

Groups Day 1: Friday, January 15

Group Match PT ET GMT
Group A 100 Thieves 1 – 0 TSM 3pm 6pm 11pm
CLG 0 – 1 Liquid 4pm 7pm 12am (Jan 16)
Group B Cloud9 0 – 1 Evil Geniuses 5pm 8pm 1am (Jan 16)
Dignitas 1 – 0 FlyQuest 6pm 9pm 2am (Jan 16)
Group A Golden Guardians vs CLG 7pm 10pm 3am (Jan 16)

Groups Day 2: Saturday, January 16

Group Match PT ET GMT
Group B Immortals vs Evil Geniuses 1pm 4pm 9pm
Group A Golden Guardians vs TSM 2pm 5pm 10pm
Group B Cloud9 vs FlyQuest 3pm 6pm 11pm
Immortals vs Dignitas 4pm 7pm 12am (Jan 17)
Group A CLG vs 100 Thieves 5pm 8pm 1am (Jan 17)

Groups Day 3: Sunday, January 17

Group Match PT ET GMT
Group B Immortals vs Cloud9 1pm 4pm 9pm
Group A Liquid vs 100 Thieves 2pm 5pm 10pm
Group B Dignitas vs Evil Geniuses 3pm 6pm 11pm
Group A CLG vs TSM 4pm 7pm 12am (Jan 18)
Golden Guardians vs Liquid 5pm 8pm 1am (Jan 18)

Groups Day 4: Friday, January 22

Group Match PT ET GMT
Group B Dignitas vs Cloud9 3pm 6pm 11pm
Group A Golden Guardians vs 100 Thieves 4pm 7pm 12am (Jan 23)
Group B Evil Geniuses vs FlyQuest 5pm 8pm 1am (Jan 23)
Group A Liquid vs TSM 6pm 9pm 2am (Jan 23)
Group B Immortals vs FlyQuest 7pm 10pm 3am (Jan 23)

Quarterfinals Day 1: Saturday, January 23

Match PT ET GMT
TBD vs TBD 1pm 4pm 9pm
TBD vs TBD 5pm 8pm 1am (Jan 24)

Quarterfinals Day 2: Sunday, January 24

Match PT ET GMT
TBD vs TBD 1pm 4pm 9pm
TBD vs TBD 5pm 8pm 1am (Jan 24)

Semifinals Day 1: Friday, January 29

Match PT ET GMT
TBD vs TBD 3pm 6pm 11pm

Semifinals Day 2: Saturday, January 30

Match PT ET GMT
TBD vs TBD 1pm 4pm 9pm

Grand Finals: Sunday, January 31

Match PT ET GMT
TBD vs TBD 1pm 4pm 9pm