Gaming

Pokimane, WildTurtle headline Forbes 30 Under 30 Gaming list for 2021

Published: 3/Dec/2020 3:14

by Andrew Amos

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Forbes has named the top gaming stars in its revised 30 Under 30 list for 2021, with the likes of streamer Imane ‘Pokimane’ Anys and League of Legends pro Jason ‘WildTurtle’ Tran getting the nod. They join an illustrious class of stars, including Ninja and Tfue.

The Forbes 30 Under 30 list is one of the awards you want to find yourself on in the gaming industry. It recognizes the rising stars of the industry, and those who have achieved greatness in the past 12 months.

Stars like Tyler ‘Ninja’ Blevins, Kyle ‘Bugha’ Giersdorf, and Turner ‘Tfue’ Tenney have topped the list in previous years. However, the class of 2020 features a distinctly different set of names from the trio who made their name in Fortnite.

Two of OfflineTV’s biggest stars, Imane ‘Pokimane’ Anys and Jeremy ‘Disguised Toast’ Wang, made the cut in 2020. While they’ve been stars for years, this year has been a huge breakout year for the duo, especially Toast.

The pair have nearly four million Twitter followers between them, as well as nearly 10 million YouTube subscribers. Among Us has only catapulted the duo’s popularity, with Toast almost tripling his YouTube following in under six months.

It’s not just the streaming stars that have been recognized. The very best esports players were also given credit for their efforts. In North America, that special honor was bestowed on League of Legends player Jason ‘WildTurtle’ Tran.

The FlyQuest AD carry made a mark on the LCS in 2020, managing to drag his underdog squad to two LCS finals and Worlds against all odds.

100 Thieves co-founder Jackson Dahl also made the list, alongside a number of developers and young owners in the growing space. You can find the full list below.

Yvonne Pokimane OfflineTV
OfflineTV
Pokimane (center-right) and Toast (center-left) both got nods on the Forbes 30 Under 30 Gaming list in 2021.

Forbes 30 Under 30 Gaming list for 2021

  • Yang Liu: Cofounder at End Game Interactive
  • Carolina Acosta: Founder at Tragos Games
  • Gage Allen: Founder at Player One Trailers
  • Preston Arsement: Founder at TBNR
  • Rachel Feinberg and Breanne Harrison-Pollock: Cofounders at Ateyo
  • Matthew Benson: Founder at Efuse
  • Jackson Dahl: Founding Team at 100 Thieves
  • Ani Mohan and Neel Rao: Cofounders at GameSnacks
  • Hailey Geller: Marketing Manager at Xbox Games
  • Elyssa Grant: Senior Producer at Penny Arcade
  • Mariano Cavallero: Founder at HopFrog
  • Emory Irpan: Head of Publisher Operations at Unity Technologies
  • Siqi Jiang: Designer
  • Cody Matthew Johnson: Cofounder at Emperia
  • Gavin Johnson: Head of Gaming at Monstercat
  • Sanaa Khan: Program Manager at Google
  • Emma Kidwell: Designer
  • Kelly Kiewel: Director of Global Partnerships at Twitch
  • Lauren Mee: Senior Writer at Insomniac Games
  • Nika Nour: Executive Director at IGDAF
  • Imane Anys: Streamer
  • Angelo Damiano, Michael Paris, and Eric Rice: Cofounders at Powerspike
  • Graciela Ruiz: Associate Producer at Google
  • Veronica Saron: Marketing Manager at Niantic Labs
  • Albert Shih: Founder at Pillow Castle
  • Alyssa Sweetman: Director of Creator Social Impact at Twitch
  • Jason Tran: Esports Athlete for FlyQuest
  • Jeremy Wang: Streamer
  • Sam Wang: Cofounder at ProGuides
  • Maddy Wojdak: Growth Strategist at Riot Games
CS:GO

Army National Guard CSGO Community Nights

Published: 13/Oct/2020 18:38 Updated: 30/Dec/2020 15:00

by Calum Patterson

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The US Army National Guard ran a series of CS:GO Community Nights and tournaments throughout the last few months of 2020, with prizes up for grabs. Here’s what went down.

Army National Gaurd

 

Starting in October, the community nights offered up 30,000 points, which could be redeemed for prizes.

For the duration of the three-month-long series, players could also register their teams for bi-weekly tournaments, which were held on the National Guard’s organizer page.

National Guard Community Nights

Every player will began with 1000 points, and was awarded 10 points for a win, or deducted 10 points for a loss. The player with the most points each night walked away with 10,000 points, 2nd and 3rd get 5,000, and 4th through 7th 2,500 each.

For the bi-weekly tournaments, starting on October 18, players were ranked on their wins/losses throughout this period. The top players proceeded to the next stage of the tournament and were rewarded with Points, from a pool of 30,000.

Missions

To make things interesting though, Missions were in-play for all matches, as a way to earn extra points. For example, actions such as getting headshots, clutches, bomb defuses, nade kills and more were rewarded.

Players were set a mission challenge, for example, get 3 clutches, and succeeding will earn points. Mor information on how missions work can be found here.