Call of Duty

Dr Disrespect explains how Black Ops Cold War could be “so much more fun”

Published: 21/Oct/2020 3:29 Updated: 21/Oct/2020 15:08

by Alex Tsiaoussidis

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Dr Disrespect has chimed in on the much-maligned SBMM system used in Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War and other titles, and although he doesn’t blame Treyarch, the Doc is less than impressed with the system and wants it removed.

Dr Disrespect is all about violence, speed, and momentum. However, he hasn’t been able to spread his wings in Black Ops Cold War and fly like the eagle he was born to be, and he blames it all on SBMM.

SBMM, which stands for skill-based matchmaking, is a system used in many popular games to try and balance out lobbies.

Some players and developers think it’s a good thing, but many others believe it tends to ‘punish’ higher-skilled players like Dr Disrespect. It throws them into lobbies with other elite players, which results in ‘sweaty’ games where everyone is good and trying really hard to win.

The game becomes more serious and less casual, and it demands more effort, which is less than ideal for streamers like the Doc, who want to entertain.

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Treyarch
Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War is one of many games that uses SBMM.

Dr Disrespect has never been one to hold his tongue and mince his words on matters important to him. In his latest stream, he had a frustrating time playing Black Ops Cold War due to SBMM and shared his thoughts.

Man, that SBMM, what a… what a…” he said, struggling to find the words to summarize his rage. “SBMM results [in] the exact same fight every single time.” It’s a sentiment shared by players from many different games and skill brackets.

“It has nothing to do with… game design,” he added.

“Treyarch knocks it out the park… I just think it has something to do with a lot of the technical stuff… I would take that tech out.”

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Dr Disrespect
Dr Disrespect isn’t one to hold back on his opinions, especially when it comes to games.

Dr Disrespect knows that it isn’t Treyarchs fault. Instead, he refers to a “third-party” who works with them and “manages all the data and everything.” He says, “they’re able to make all these tweaks, and all that stuff,” and the fact that SBMM is implemented at all is “such a bummer.”

“I want some sheep in my lobbies,” he said. “I want a couple triple peekers. The game could like just be so much more fun. I don’t understand why they have it.”

The related segment begins at 3:38:30 in the video below.

Dr Disrespect isn’t the first person to express his concerns about SBMM, and he won’t be the last. However, the Doc is a pillar in the gaming community. He has also been involved in some behind-the-scenes level design, so his opinion has some weight.

Either way, Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War is still loads of fun. SBMM might even help you become a better player if you’re willing to embrace it.

Call of Duty

Warzone players outraged as stats change protects hackers & SBMM abuse

Published: 16/Jan/2021 14:41 Updated: 16/Jan/2021 14:47

by Connor Bennett

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Call of Duty: Warzone players have aired their concerns with the recent changes making profile stats private following the companion app drama, with some players pointing out that the change helps cheaters hide from punishment. 

Like many other multiplayer games, Warzone has had its issues with both hackers and skill-based matchmaking ruining the experience for some players.

While they’ve both always been an annoyance, players recently discovered that some were using an app from the CoDTracker site, and another called ‘SBMMWarzone’, that helped them pick and choose their lobbies. These apps were, initially, meant to be used to root out cheaters, but it backfired and SBMM abuse became the primary use. 

Changes were made to the app to help quell the abuse, and Activision even made every Warzone account private so that the data couldn’t reach similar apps. However, that has caused annoyance as well.

Black Ops Cold War Season 1 Trailer Adler
Activision / Treyarch
SBMM in Black Ops Cold War & Warzone has been an issue for a while.

CoD YouTuber Drift0r pointed out that, given how annoying the new opt-in process is to share Warzone stats – and that it isn’t mandatory, either – players will simply choose to stay hidden. 

“Some of them (pro players and record holders) might not want to opt-in, or like me, might not be able too or it might take a while, which means that if anybody is cheating at a high level, either to get YouTube content or to stream tournaments, they can just opt out of all this and keep the cheating private,” he said.

The YouTuber noted that, while Activision might have the data on their end and could root out cheaters, it makes it harder for the community to assist them in that fight. 

Other players backed up Drift0r’s concerns about the cheating and SBMM abuse, with some offering up ideas for future changes. 

“They’ll literally do everything except just tone down SBMM, which would mitigate all these other issues,” said one player. “There’s an elephant in the room and its name is cheating. Activision just reopened the highway for cheating. Shameful,” added another.

Others, though, took a different slant, saying: “This officially ruined the game for me. I liked having public stats. It gave me something to work towards in improving… now what’s the point since no one can see them and I have nothing to compare mine to.”

As Drift0r notes, it could become a case where the opt-in process is made mandatory in the future, as it seems to a situation that is majorly in flux – given that there have been two changes in quick succession.

It could also be the case that Activision decides to not do anything else, and this is their final move. Though, given the outrage from the community, that seems unlikely.