Pro Valorant players told not to teabag during official match at VCT EU - Dexerto
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Pro Valorant players told not to teabag during official match at VCT EU

Published: 6/Mar/2021 21:31

by Alan Bernal

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In the lead-up to G2 Esports’ VCT EU match against DfuseTeam, the admins in the server reportedly told the Valorant pros not to teabag their opponents. They deemed the act ‘undesirable.’

Moments before an intense head-to-head against Dfuse, G2’s Patryk ‘paTiTek’ Fabrowski posted what looks like a message from the Valorant Champions Tour admins advising the lobby not to embellish their kills.

“One additional info: Please do not tea-bag or shoot on dead enemies during the match,” the message read. “This behavior is not desired during the broadcast.”

Teabagging, and other forms of in-game gloating or toxicity, have been a hot topic in Valorant. The acts themselves might be menial, but the overall Valorant community has been battling with notable surges of toxicity with Riot trying to quell the fires as they arise.

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On their good days, G2 Esports is one of the more dominant teams in EU Valorant. So far in the esport, when leads start to extend we see players have a bit of fun when rounds end – usually at the opponent’s expense.

This has proven to be decisive in Valorant echo-chambers. Some think that pro players are broadcasting negativity by teabagging opponents, while others say these acts are fair game and can even contribute to the mental aspect of the match.

Regardless, G2 Esports founder Carlos ‘Ocelote’ Rodríguez couldn’t believe the message from the admin and suggested his players take another route.

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“Wait I hope this is a troll,” Ocelote said. “If I don’t see some teabagging today I will certainly lose my shit.” After G2 went up 9-0 in map 1 vs Dfuse in VCT Challengers, Carlos said: “LETS FUCKING GOOOO! TEABAG THAT BITCH!”

Back at First Strike NA, Sentinels’ Michael ‘dapr’ Gulino said he had received death threats after teabagging 100 Thieves Joshua ‘steel’ Nissan in a match.

These kinds of incidents are sure to be seen by people at Riot, who could be trying to find a meaningful solution to the problem lest it gets out of hand.

Of course, until there’s an official rule implemented by Riot Games, don’t expect Valorant pros to stop teabagging during intense games.

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