PUBG announce $2m Global Championship details - Dexerto
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PUBG announce $2m Global Championship details

Published: 6/Nov/2018 19:41 Updated: 6/Nov/2018 19:50

by Wyatt Donigan

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PUBG’s 2019 season is set to have a structure unlike anything seen in the game’s history to go along with a massive $2 million prize pool for the Global Championship alone. 

While Fortnite Battle Royale and Black Ops 4’s Blackout have dominated the conversation surrounding the battle royale genre, PUBG is still alive and well heading into 2019.

The new year will see PUBG reach new heights in the competitive scene as they have brought out all the stops to ensure that this will be the biggest season yet for the game.

Most notably, PUBG has named nine independent regions that will host their own competitions all throughout the year. Six of these regions will feature a ‘pro league’ structure, while the other three will operate on a ‘pro circuit’ basis with a series of tournaments instead:

  • North America (National PUBG League; NPL)
  • Europe (PUBG Europe League; PEL)
  • Korea (PUBG Korea League; PKL)
  • Japan (PUBG Japan Series; PJS)
  • China (League name TBD)
  • Chinese Taipei/Hong Kong/Macao (League name TBD)
  • Southeast Asia
  • Latin America 
  • Oceania

All nine regions will be competing on a globally aligned calendar that will operate in distinct phases throughout the year. Phase 1 runs from January to March. Phase 2 runs from May to June. Phase 3 runs from August to October.

Sprinkled in the midst of these phases will be global events that will feature the top teams from each region. An All-Star game will also take place just before Phase 3 in August and will consist of a series of exhibition matches with a casual and entertainment focus.

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The entire year will then culminate with the Global Championship in November that will see the best teams from each region compete for a prize pool of “at least $2 million.”

The 2019 season will also be different from previous seasons in that there will be a universal ruleset across all nine regions to prevent any kind of confusion between competitions.

Every pro competition will place 16 squads on Erangel and Miramar in first-person perspective mode only. There will also be unified settings for esports games with unique blue zone settings and item drop rates for ultra-competitive play. Every event will also follow the same points system, which is being re-designed to find the perfect balance between competitive gameplay and an entertaining viewing experience.

You can read the full details for the 2019 PUBG season down below:

Get Ready for the 2019 Season of PUBG Esports

TL;DR:

  • In 2019, there will be nine independent regions, each with its own series of pro competitions – North America (NPL), Europe (PEL), Korea (PKL), China, Japan (PJS), Chinese Taipei/Hong Kong/Macao, Southeast Asia, Latin America, and Oceania.
  • All regional pro competitions will begin and end within the same windows called “phases,” which will take place three times a season.
    All of the nine pro regions will be given an opportunity to send their top-performing teams to the Global Championship at the end of the season, which will have a prize pool of at least 2 million dollars.
  • At the midpoint in the season, we will host the All-Star Games to bring together the most popular players from all over the world for a weekend full of fun exhibition matches.
  • We are in discussions with industry-leading third-party organizers to create other unique global events during breaks between phases, where best teams from each phase will compete internationally.
  • All regional and global pro competitions will adopt the universal ruleset for 2019 – FPP, 16 teams per game, 4-person squads, Erangel & Miramar, unified points system, and unified in-game settings.

Hey Everyone,

PUBG esports is about to get serious. Starting next year, we’re introducing official pro competitions in nine different regions around the globe. We’ll also be hosting numerous global events throughout the year, including the All-Star Games in August and the Global Championship in November where the #1 team of the season will be crowned. Read below to find out more!

Nine Pro Regions

In 2019, PUBG will recognize nine independent pro regions around the globe. Each region will have its own series of pro competitions that will bring the top regional talent together and give birth to the local champions.

There will be 6 regions with a “pro league” structure: North America (National PUBG League; NPL), Europe (PUBG Europe League; PEL), Korea (PUBG Korea League; PKL), China, Japan (PUBG Japan Series; PJS), and Chinese Taipei/Hong Kong/Macao. Southeast Asia, Latin America, and Oceania will have a “pro circuit” structure with a series of tournaments instead.

Globally Aligned Calendar

Aligning the competitive calendar across all regions is critical for building a season-long narrative with distinct periods designated for local competitions and regular season breaks that enable sufficient time for global events featuring top teams from each region.

The 2019 season will be divided into three phases throughout the year. Phase 1 will begin in late January and last until the end of March. Phase 2 will begin in early May and end in June. Phase 3 will start in mid-August and end in mid-October. All regional pro competitions will take place during these predetermined phases.

Global Events

Between Phase 2 and Phase 3, at the midpoint of the season, we will be hosting the All-Star Games. The most popular pro PUBG players from all over the world will be invited to a series of exhibition matches that will be differentiated from other competitions by their casual and entertainment-focused nature.

At the end of the 2019 season, we will be hosting the Global Championship, which will feature the best teams from each region who will duke it out for the ultimate chicken dinner. All nine pro regions will have an opportunity to send their regional representatives to this final showdown. The winner of the Global Championship will be crowned the undisputed champion of the entire season and take home a million dollars in prize money. We are exploring the possibility of adding other bonuses on top of the initial prize pool of 2 million dollars; more details will follow in the coming weeks.

We are also currently in discussions with industry-leading third-party organizers with the goal of creating other unique global events during breaks between phases, where the best teams from each phase will compete internationally. Stay tuned for more details about these global partner events.

Universal Ruleset

From the feedback we received, one of the greatest pain points for professional players and viewers alike in 2018 has been the discrepancy in the rulesets adopted by different tournament organizers. The wild variance in the esports rules prevented players from scaling up their skills and strategies efficiently, and forced viewers to learn how to watch the games every time a different event took place.

2019 will see all pro competitions, whether regional or global, third-party or first-party, adhere to a standardised, universal set of rules. Every pro competition will place 16 squads on Erangel and Miramar in first-person perspective mode only. There will also be unified settings for esports games with unique blue zone settings and item drop rates for ultra-competitive play. Every event will also follow the same points system, which is being re-designed to find the perfect balance between competitive gameplay and an entertaining viewing experience.

More details on each regional competition and global events will follow in the coming weeks, so stay tuned!

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Blatant PUBG cheater gets banned by a dev live on Twitch

Published: 22/Nov/2020 0:33

by Alan Bernal

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A known cheater in PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds managed to get hit by the banhammer while he was streaming live on Twitch, creating a wave of cheers among community members.

The Twitch account under question goes by the name of ‘vesprine,’ but the player himself is widely known in PUBG lobbies and online communities for perpetually making new accounts just to use cheats.

“He keeps resurfacing. Same guy over and over. He tries to join Plausible and gets insta-banned,” Reddit user ‘The-Basic-Bro’ said. “He needs a hardware ban at this point. He legitimately cheats non-stop… He has joined looking for squad groups on Reddit and the last two times I have called him out and disgraced him and had him banned.”

While some players want to see more stringent action taken against the player, PUBG Community Manager who goes by ‘Hawkinz’ did his part to stymie the cheater’s effect on the game.

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PUBG has come a long way since its launch, but hackers have still been a major problem.

During one of his streams, the player had resurfaced to show off more PUBG gameplay supplemented by the use of in-game hacks.

In the middle of his broadcast, he got a notification in PUBG that read: “Restricted Account – Your session will be terminated due to use of hacks.” Though not much has survived the Twitch account since he was banned, a screengrab by user ‘701dirty’ immortalized Hawkinz’s incredible response as the moment played out.

According to 701Dirty, the ban happened shortly after over a hundred people clipped and reported the streamer while he was playing.

“A few hours later over 100 people clipping and (saying) they got one of his accounts,” 701Dirty wrote. “I saw him have two accounts banned after matches and he tried logging into several already banned accounts… crazy.”

Cheater banned in real time from PUBATTLEGROUNDS

Since its launch, PUBG’s servers have been swarming with hackers that have put a damper on the once-dominant battle royale.

The developers have issued multiple ban waves since the game’s launch in 2017, but are still combating the prevalence of cheaters years later.

Unfortunately, unless more meaningful action against PUBG’s hackers is taken, players like vesprine are going to continue to ruin matches, get banned, then reappear under another name.