FaZe Clan pro Jarvis permanently banned on Fortnite - Dexerto
Entertainment

FaZe Clan pro Jarvis permanently banned on Fortnite

Published: 3/Nov/2019 20:55 Updated: 3/Nov/2019 22:38

by Eli Becht

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FaZe Clan member Jarvis ‘Jarvis’ Kaye has revealed he has been permanently banned from Fortnite in a video uploaded on November 3. 

Epic Games handed out a major ban to the FaZe Clan creator after he uploaded a series of videos in which he used an aimbot on his alt account.

Although it wasn’t on his main account, or in a competitive setting, Epic still made the decision to ban Jarvis from the game permanently, effectively ending his Fortnite career.

epic gamesJarvis won’t get to experience the rest of Chapter 2.

“I’m not sure how many of you know this, but I’ve actually been banned on Fortnite for life,” he said. “Recently, I’ve posted some videos of me using aimbot in solos and playground mode. All I was thinking about while making those videos is how entertaining and like interesting these videos would be for you guys to watch. It didn’t even cross my mind I could be banned for life from Fortnite for this.”

He goes on to say it is his first ban ever and reiterates it did not take place during a competitive game mode.

It’s a major blow to him as he explained in his video that Fortnite changed his life since its release in 2017 and without it, he wasn’t even sure what he’d be doing right now.

“It’s genuinely insane how big of an impact has had on my life,” he explained. “I wouldn’t be here without this game. I’m not even sure what I’d be doing right now if Fortnite wasn’t a thing.”

Numerous Fortnite players have taken to Twitter to voice their support for the FaZe member by using the hashtag “#FreeJarvis” in an effort to raise awareness and perhaps get Epic to reverse their decision.

Given the pull FaZe Clan has, it’s possible they could do some convincing and get Jarvis’ ban reversed in the future. The ban has drawn a lot of criticism as well considering how Fortnite pro XXiF was caught cheating during the World Cup, but was only given a two-week ban.

Following his ban, XXiF was still able to compete in the World Cup. For the time being, Jarvis remains permanently banned.

A lot can change in Fortnite over the course of several weeks, so perhaps we could see a reversed ban in the near future.

Entertainment

Dream responds to #dreamwaswrong trending on Twitter

Published: 22/Jan/2021 21:53

by Theo Salaun

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YouTuber and Minecraft content creator Dream has finally responded to the #dreamwaswrong trend on Twitter, using his DreamWasTaken account to assert he disavows the behavior displayed by some of his fans.

Dream and his cohorts, including known creators like Tommyinnit and GeorgeNotFound, are incredibly popular on YouTube and beyond thanks to an infinitum of Dream Team videos and the Dream SMP server.

While that level of fame means possibility for mainstream collaboration with the likes of superstar TikTok influencer Addison Rae, it also comes with downsides. Notably, #dreamwaswrong began trending on Twitter as fans blamed Dream for encouraging his stans, some of whom are prone to producing inappropriate fan art involving minors.

As critics explain, Dream’s love for his fans supposedly equates to egging on the ways they express their fandom — thereby supporting the production of “CP.” In response, he explained: “I’ve said this before but don’t ship creators that are uncomfortable with it, and especially not minors. It’s disgusting to draw NSFW stuff about minors or anyone that hasn’t explicitly said it’s fine.”

After addressing the drama directly, by reaffirming that “NSFW stuff about minors” is distasteful, Dream continued on to explain why it’s unfair to misgeneralize his role in the production of such content.

In a follow-up tweet aimed at defending his support for his fans, the Minecraft YouTuber said, “With 16 million subscribers that’s 1 out of every 480 people IN THE WORLD that are subscribed. There’s bound to be thousands of terrible people, but there’s also bound to be millions of great ones. If you’re looking for hate or disgusting stuff, you’ll find it. Stop looking.”

As he shows, boasting 16 million subscribers on YouTube means that “out of every 480 people in the world,” at least one is a fan of Dream’s content. That is an enormous quantity of supporters, and it should not be surprising that there are “thousands of terrible people” within the millions of fans.

This sentiment appears to be echoed by his fans — as many have resurfaced earlier videos showing that the content creator has never specifically encouraged the creation of relationship fanfiction or “CP.”

It remains unclear how satisfied people are with Dream’s response, but the overall sentiment appears to be positive. While it feels unreasonable to expect a creator to be wholly responsible for the actions of their audience, this incident does provide a cautionary tale.

Considering this “disgusting” group of Dream’s stans, the prevailing community critique remains: If you are an influencer, you have some obligation to directly and quickly curtail negative behavior by those you influence.