CS:GO

How to call a Technical Timeout in CSGO Competitive

Published: 28/Jan/2021 5:19

by Andrew Amos

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Valve has added Technical Timeouts to CS:GO Competitive in their January 27 update. It’s different from the game’s already-existing Tactical Timeouts. Here’s exactly how they work, and how you can call one for your team.

The addition of Technical Timeouts built into CS:GO comes as Valve has looked to revamp Competitive play by removing bots, and even adding bonus income for teams down on players.

It’s different from the already-existing Tactical Timeouts ⁠— which players can call once per half in a CS:GO Competitive game. In fact, you don’t really get an opportunity to call a tech pause, as they automatically go through.

Here’s how the new feature works, and how you can best utilize it to boot.

How to use Technical Timeouts in CS:GO

Technical Timeouts aren’t something you can call on command in CS:GO. In a matchmade competitive game, something has to go awry first.

Technical Timeouts can only be called if a player has disconnected from the game, and hasn’t reconnected by the time the next round starts. They will be automatically called, and will last two minutes at most. This allows the DC’d player time to reconnect to the game.

The timeout will automatically be canceled if the DC’d player abandons the game. Timeouts also won’t be called in a 4v5 if the player was kicked. Each team gets one Technical Timeout. It doesn’t count towards your Tactical Timeout count.

CS:GO Tactical Timeout menu
Valve
Tactical Timeouts have existed in CS:GO matchmaking for some time, but not tech pauses.

Hopefully you won’t ever have to use a Technical Timeout in CS:GO competitive queues. If it does come down to it though, it’s a handy tool that will allow players to get back into the game if their internet died or their game crashed.

In the downtime, you can talk strategies about tackling the game while a man down ⁠— or a man up. However, you won’t just be able to call it for your mouse glitching out, or a sticky desk mishap.

CS:GO

Real Madrid’s Casemiro explains why CSGO is more nerve-wracking than football

Published: 22/Feb/2021 20:10

by Bill Cooney

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Real Madrid’s Casemiro might just be one of the most famous footballers in the world today, but surprisingly enough, playing CSGO makes the pro sweat more than being on the pitch.

The 29-year-old Brazilian has been a fixture for Real Madrid on the field since joining in 2013, but apart from football it’s no secret Casemiro also likes to spend his free time perfecting those CSGO skills.

That’s no surprise seeing as how Valve’s shooter is massive in Brazil, and Miro even has his own esports org for the game. What is surprising though is that Casemiro has claimed in a new interview he gets more nervous streaming CSGO matches than he does playing football in front of thousands of screaming fans.

Casemiro CSGO FURIA
FURIA
Casemiro and Neymar (left side) are both huge CSGO fans.

In a new interview with Spanish football site MARCA, Casemiro claimed that playing CSGO on stream for viewers made him more nervous than playing a match at the 80,000+ seat Bernabéu (Real’s home grounds).

“Without a doubt, people are much closer and when I fail, there are some insults,” The pro explained with a laugh. “When I play Counter-Strike I get a lot more nervous there than playing at the Bernabéu. I feel more pressure with people watching me play video games live than football.”

Casemiro also drew interesting comparisons between CSGO and football, saying that he finds most success when he plays similar to his IRL position on the field, instead of a straight-up offensive one.

“I’m one of those that if I go in to play, I don’t like to lose. I’ve tried to play like a striker or winger [in CSGO] and my score has been very low,” he explained.  “I know that my position is defensive midfielder and I have to help my teammates. What I am in real life, I also am in video games.”

While he might not be rushing B and popping off like S1mple, the Brazilian international thinks he manages quite well with his favorite weapon the AWP, and on his favorite map — Inferno — which he called “my Berbabéu.”

He also admitted that despite owning a CSGO team, he doesn’t think he quite has what it takes to play professionally. That’s quite alright though, as he can always fall back on that multi-million dollar football career.