League of Legends

Doublelift reveals internal issues behind TSM’s collapse at Worlds 2020

Published: 25/Oct/2020 11:48

by Luke Edwards

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TSM AD carry Yiliang ‘Doublelift’ Peng has criticized his team’s “undisciplined” scrim play which led to their horrendous 0-6 run at Worlds 2020.

TSM went into Worlds as the LCS first seed, hoping to reach the knockout stage for the first time since 2014. Drawn into a group with Fnatic, LGD, and Gen.G, TSM wasn’t necessarily expected to progress from their group, but fans believed they could at least take a game or two.

But TSM limped out without a win, and the fallout has been huge. Long-time midlaner Bjergsen announced his retirement yesterday, with his move to head coach likely to kick off a revamp of the side.

As TSM’s most senior player, Doublelift took some time on his stream to offer fans more insight on what went wrong for them at Worlds this year.

Doublelift playing for TSM
Riot Games
Doublelift has offered his insight into TSM’s abysmal Worlds 2020 showing.

Speaking on his Twitch stream, Peng explained: “Losing trust in each other made us play even worse. After the first week, we probably had a 10% win rate in scrims. I was grateful to win even a single game per day. A lot of the games were either over after level one, or in the first five minutes.

“People on the team started ruining practice by coin flipping and playing stupidly. You need some discipline to stay focused on the goals. We lost all of our team play.”

TSM’s trust issues

As LCS analyst MarkZ pointed out, TSM’s performance was statistically the worst ever produced by a pool one team.

The communication issues were evident through some bizarre pieces of play. Rookie jungler Spica produced one of the most memorable plays of the tournament, but not for the right reasons.

His “nine-man” Lillia sleep was not only heavily memed by the community, it also provided a perfect example of TSM’s loss of confidence and lack of trust in each other.

A fully confident TSM likely would have followed in on Spica’s engage to win the fight and potentially take the game. Bjergsen’s first task will be to build up the confidence of whatever roster he has at his disposal.

TSM finds itself with a lot of work to do if it hopes to end a torrid run of international performances.

League of Legends

Doublelift explains how TSM’s “bad” SwordArt negotiations made him retire

Published: 2/Dec/2020 1:24 Updated: 2/Dec/2020 1:43

by Alan Bernal

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League of Legends star Yiliang ‘Doublelift’ Peng revealed more about the strained timeline of Team SoloMid’s negotiations with Hu ‘SwordArt’ Shuo-Chieh, which ultimately led the North American veteran to retire.

Doublelift went into the off-season with a single objective for TSM: sign an elite support who spoke English. SwordArt just got done with a stellar season lifting his team to win the LPL 2020 Regional Finals and getting second place at Worlds.

The TSM veteran also recommended Team Flash’s Nguyễn ‘Palette’ Hải Trung as a suitable support for TSM. However, DL really wanted to play with a bot-lane partner that spoke his native English; a requirement Palette didn’t fulfill, but SwordArt did.

TSM were looking forward to staving off Doublelift’s retirement by making a deal with SwordArt. However, TSM later told their star ADC that negotiations were shaky, and asked if he would be okay with Palette instead. He wasn’t.

On November 25th, Doublelift retired. On November 26th, TSM announced they had successfully signed SwordArt from Suning on a two-year deal that would pay him an LCS-high of $3 million per season.

“No, I didn’t know SwordArt was coming before I retired,” Doublelift said, before explaining how rough transfer discussions made him lean into retirement. “I was really excited for the whole SwordArt thing. They told me SwordArt was confirmed, and I got really excited

“And then I guess the negotiations were going really bad at certain points. So then they told me: ‘Actually, (the deal with SwordArt) fell through. It’s not going to work. Would you still be committed if your support was Palette?’”

Although impressed with Palette, DL was really keen on getting the bot-lane synergy rolling with someone he could effectively communicate with.

At this point, SwordArt was the unobtainable lynchpin in keeping Doublelift from retirement.

But it wasn’t until a day after Doublelift, 27, decided to retire, after production had wrapped on his retirement video, and after TSM were already moving past the seasoned ADC, that the org announced the new support.

“The whole situation made me realize: I’m better off retired,” Doublelift said.