Xbox Series X release date & launch price finally revealed - Dexerto
Gaming

Xbox Series S: Release date, trailer, price specs, more

Published: 8/Sep/2020 17:45 Updated: 6/Nov/2020 17:18

by Isaac McIntyre

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The Xbox Series S release date and initial launch prices have finally been revealed and confirmed by Microsoft themselves. The Xbox Series X has also been revealed, but only through new insider reports.

The next-generation Xbox consoles will both be released worldwide on Tuesday, November 10, trusted Microsoft insiders Jez Corden and Zac Brown have reported. This was confirmed by Xbox just hours later, at least for the Series S.

The entry-level Xbox Series S console ⁠— which appeared online ahead of schedule thanks to an early promo video release ⁠— will cost $299 USD at launch.

Microsoft will also reportedly release its more powerful Xbox Series X at the same time. The Series X will launch at a slightly more expensive $499 USD price point, according to leaks.

These prices, at least for the Xbox Series S, line up with where the Xbox One and Xbox One X were originally launched. It’s likely the Series X will be at the higher price point.

The Xbox Series S is half as big as Microsoft's flagship next-gen Xbox Series X console.
Microsoft, via @bdsams
The Xbox Series S is half as big as Microsoft’s flagship next-gen Xbox Series X console.

The leaked Xbox Series X and S release date and launch prices comes just hours after Xbox fans were given their first look at the Series S. The cheaper console is quite a bit smaller than its bigger brother, and will be white.

Windows Central is tipping the Series S to be “roughly as powerful” as the Xbox One X, and have suggested it will be geared towards 1080p monitors.

The reports are also suggesting all Xbox Series X and S consoles will come with a $25 per month Xbox All Access financing option. This will include Xbox Live, and access to the huge catalog of Xbox Game Pass titles.

Xbox Series X vs Series S specs

Series X vs Series S
Microsoft
Spec comparison between Series X and Series S.

While Microsoft’s next generation of consoles is slowly having its information dripped out ahead of the big reveal, we’ve seen very little on the other side of the console war.

Xbox Series S pricing

With the release of The Xbox Series S on November 10, 2020, we’ve gone ahead and put together region-specific information on pricing, release dates, and where to buy them. Check out below to see how and where to get your hands on them where you are:

Xbox Series S UK info

  • £249.99
  • £7.99 per month for Xbox Game Pass
  • £10.99 per month for Xbox Game Pass Ultimate

Places to pick up your Xbox Series S:

Xbox Series S US info

  • $299
  • $9.99 per month for Xbox Game Pass
  • £14.99 per month for Xbox Game Pass Ultimate

Places to pick up your Xbox Series S:

Xbox Series S EU info

  •  €299
  •  €9.99 per month for Xbox Game Pass
  • €14.99 per month for Xbox Game Pass Ultimate

Xbox All Access Plan

Alternatively to buying the console outright, Xbox has an All Access plan which allows you to purchase and pay for the console. This is a fantastic financing method to allow you to get the console straight off the bat. It also includes Xbox Game Pass Ultimate, and comes in at $24.99/£20.99 monthly.

This option is available for those in the US at the WalmartTarget, Microsoft & Best Buy.

In the UK, you can find it at Microsoft, Smyths Toys, GAME.

Sony has kept its ship tight, apparently, and that means hiding the PlayStation 5’s possible release dates too. There have been rumors the PS5 may clock in at $599 USD, but considering Xbox’s leaked lower price, that could be changed.

With the cat out of the bag for one of the consoles, it’s likely more news will come for the Series X soon. Keep your eyes peeled during, or even ahead of, Xbox’s planned Tokyo event later this month, on September 24.

Business

TikTok competitors Byte and Clash form merger to take on video giant

Published: 26/Jan/2021 20:23 Updated: 26/Jan/2021 20:24

by Chris Stokel-Walker

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The battle to try and compete with TikTok in the shortform video space has just become less bloody, as two of TikTok’s competitors have merged.

Clash, set up by former Vine star Brendon McNerney, has agreed to buy Byte, the app developed by Vine founder Dom Hofman, for an undisclosed sum.

The purchase, which is in part funded and enacted by a separate round of seed funding for Clash from Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian’s Seven Seven Six and two other investors, is an unusual one. “It’s going to put Clash in a whole new ballgame, where we have support I couldn’t even imagine,” says McNerney, who declined to share the amount invested in his company.

Clash is by far the smaller of the two apps, with 500,000 users as of fall 2020, its founder McNerney confirmed. By comparison, Byte has 4.5 million users.

clash videos tiktok
Clash
Clash was launched to compete with TikTok, and is now buying out another competitor in Byte.

What’s more, Clash is going to take itself off app stores, encourage its users to migrate over to the bigger Byte, and then rebrand the app as Clash in the coming months.

“It may seem like a confusing move, but Byte has the userbase,” says McNerney. “We have the creative tools, and we want to point people to the future home of Clash.

“The plan over the next few months is to relaunch the Byte app as Clash,” says McNerney. “This relaunch will have all our monetization tools live.”

byte tiktok competitor creativity first
Byte
Byte boasted 4.5m users before the merger.

Clash has placed its focus on supporting creators’ ability to monetize their content — a bugbear many early TikTok users had until the app launched its Creator Fund, which gives creators over a certain size a share of financial funding to keep making videos.

“We’re 100% merging both of these communities together,” says McNerney. “There’s such a fluidity between not just the types of creators, but even the types of content on both platforms. Dom [Hofman] has done such a great job in building these creative tools. The thing we’re focusing on is not disturbing the experience on either of these platforms.”

McNerney admitted the merger took him by surprise. “It’s definitely unusual, and not something we were expecting to have happen,” he says.

Hofman, who was not made available for interview, will not be staying on with Byte, McNerney says. “Him and his team are not a part of this deal. They’re going on to another venture, which is exciting for them,” he explains. “They’ll be making an announcement on that.”

tiktok mobile app
Unsplash: Solen Feyissa
Many apps have launched to rival TikTok, but Clash and Byte have joined forces to help bolster shortform video content.

Hofman and Byte were convinced to sell up because of the pro-creator stance of Clash, the latter’s owner says. “It was something they had been considering but hadn’t necessarily made any move on,” he says.

The whole process of the deal took place in “a few weeks.” “It happened rather quickly,” says McNerney. Negotiations didn’t begin until 2021.

“We’re going to be working in the next month or two integrating all our tools [into Clash],” he adds. “We want to make sure the user experience is largely unedited as far as what Byte users can expect. There are tons of them and we don’t want to disturb their experience.”

McNerney’s goal isn’t necessarily for the newly-merged app’s five million users to take on TikTok’s 690 million users worldwide. “To be explicit, Clash is the monetization platform,” he says. “What we see as a massive missing pillar in the shortform video world is a place where creators can monetize.”