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Fortnite Battle Royale • Nov 06, 2018

Fortnite: The Trio vs Squad console world record from April has finally been broken

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Fortnite: The Trio vs Squad console world record from April has finally been broken

It seems that barely a day goes by without another Fortnite world record being smashed, and it’s happened again. This time, a record that had stood since April of 2018 has been broken.

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On November 5 we reported that the Solo eliminations world record for PC had been broken yet again, this time by a talented Asian player that managed to find a staggering 34 kills in one game.

Later that day we received information that the Trio vs Squad world record for console had also been smashed on November 4, and we’ve now got our hands of the video evidence that confirms it.

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‘Innocents’, a well known Xbox One player, managed to demolish the previous record with the help of ‘ArtieTheGod’ and ‘iMrSharpShooter’.

The trio racked up a staggering 49 kills in total - innocents and Artie picked up 18 eliminations each and MrSharpShooter rounded things out with 13 of his own:

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The previous recorded record of 43 kills had been set back in April by iSkiiiz, Az0t3 and Xtrem-Zapeur, then equaled in May by Smxthyyyy, Scootchyy and Bigbazza.

Unfortunately for innocents, who has almost 10,000 followers on Twitch and over 11,000 subscribers on YouTube, the original video file was corrupted, meaning that his trio’s record breaking game had to be uploaded from the replay mode.

Replay mode or not, the gameplay is still incredibly impressive to behold and it’s easy to understand why some of innocents fans believe he is among the best console players on the planet.

As always, you can keep track off all the current world records by visiting our hub here. If you believe any of the records are incorrect or out-of-date, message @Dexerto on Twitter with supporting evidence. Videos are preferred.