Entertainment

YouTuber JayStation accused of faking girlfriend's death

by Calum Patterson
YouTube: Dream Team

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JayStation, a YouTuber with almost 5.5 million subscribers, has both shocked and confused fans, with a video reporting the death of his girlfriend, Alexia.

On January 22, JayStation posted a 4-minute video title "My Girlfriend Alexia has died... *Rest in Paradise*." Appearing distressed, he explains "last night, we lost Alexia to a drunk driver, guys. She was going to pick up something for our video on our second channel. She's gone guys. She's gone."

However, fans have been left confused, as after the video reporting her death had been posted, another video was posted to their second channel, featuring Alexia.

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This second video, titled "LIE DETECTOR TEST TURNS INTO REAL BREAKUP!! (CHALLENGE)", features an alive and well Alexia.

Update: Video has been removed from YouTube.

JayStation does say that the couple already had five videos lined up, but fans were surprised to see this posted following news of her apparent death.

In a follow-up video on his own channel, JayStation made a visit to a streetside vigil for Alexia. The memorial already had a cross, images of Alexia, a teddy bear and flowers when he arrived.

The YouTuber also notices a sign, which was out of place and bent over, explaining "she must have crashed into this sign."

JayStation says he still plans to upload content, but that "it won't be the same without her."

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The odd circumstances around the video have led some to suggest that the video and death of Alexia Marano is fake.

Fellow YouTuber OrdinaryGamers says he has checked with police departments in Toronto and Ottowa, near where JayStation reportedly lives, and there are no reports confirming the death.

Drama Alert host Daniel 'KEEMSTAR' Keem has started a hashtag in an effort to ban JayStation from the platform, also accusing him of faking the death.

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The Canadian YouTuber has previously sparked controversy with his videos. Most infamously, he used a oujia board to "contact" late streamer Etika – on the same day as his suicide. This prompted a petition to have him banned.

He's also been accused of faking numerous other videos, including one in which he was apparently beaten up in his own home.