xQc scores hilarious own goal to lose intense 20 minute Rocket League match - Dexerto
Entertainment

xQc scores hilarious own goal to lose intense 20 minute Rocket League match

Published: 24/Dec/2018 12:45 Updated: 24/Dec/2018 13:09

by Matt Porter

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Popular streamer Félix ‘xQc’ Lengyel couldn’t believe his eyes when he cost his team a match on Rocket League – by scoring an own goal at the end of a nearly 20 minute game.

Lengyel became well known on Twitch when he was a professional Overwatch player, representing the Dallas Fuel in the Overwatch League. Following his release from the team in March 2018, xQc had continued to stream Overwatch, but decided to move to variety streaming, after his Overwatch account was suspended yet again.

Since then, the Canadian has tried out a number of different games as he expands his streaming repertoire, with Rocket League becoming the latest game to infuriate the Twitch star.

PsyonixRocket League allows players to play soccer with cars.

While playing on Sunday, December 23, Lengyel found himself embroiled in an incredibly nervy match, which finished 5-5 after five minutes and meant both teams were forced to play overtime, where the first team to score a goal wins.

Incredibly, this overtime lasted almost 14 minutes, until xQc hilariously hit the ball into his own net while trying to defend, causing them to lose the game. “I’m going to shoot myself,” mumbled Lengyel, shocked at what he had done. “I’m done with it.”

While xQc claimed he was done with Rocket League, he continued to play it – although things didn’t get any better. 

The Canadian accidentally sent up another opponent for an easy goal, and was so furious he could just slam his hands into his desk, unsure of how to react.

Entertainment

Dream angered by backlash blaming him for his fans’ actions

Published: 24/Jan/2021 2:07

by Theo Salaun

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Following a wave of online controversy, popular Minecraft YouTuber Dream took to Twitter to address critics and show them why he believes all of the backlash is inherently misguided.

Dream and the Dream Team, with friends like Tommyinnit and Quackity, have been one of the largest sources of online entertainment thanks to a consistent flood of content across YouTube and Twitch. While their videos and streams, including of the entire Dream SMP Minecraft server, have brought Dream a huge amount of fans — that popularity appears to have come with a downside.

Originally, most of the drama surrounding Dream involved accusations about him cheating during a 1.16 Minecraft speedrun. But now, a very different sort of critique has emerged, as fans and critics bemoan the content creator’s inability to restrain the least appropriate segments of his community.

Over the past week, #dreamwaswrong began trending on Twitter and similar complaints moved across social media. The basis for this backlash surrounded a subculture of Dream fans that had begun creating inappropriate fanfiction and art involving the minors who represented the Dream Team. In response, Dream has shot down those critics.

Drawing a theoretical parallel, the faceless content creator philosophically makes his perspective known. Mocking his critics, Dream criticizes the media and his detractors using a hypothetical scenario.

“Dream has refused to condemn murder after one of his fans turned out to be a murderer. Will he finally be held accountable?”

Essentially, Dream suggests that people criticize him for the actions of others — noting that he ought to be “held accountable” for the vile actions (in this hypothetical instance: murder) of his fans. The point of this example is to highlight the absurdity of a causal relationship between influencer and the influenced.

Dream Artwork Dream Branding
dreambranding.com
Who needs a face when you have a lot of fans?

While fans and critics appear to be divided on the efficacy of Dream’s tweet, it’s clear that he is trying to push back against those who blame him for the actions of his viewers. In the social media age, this relationship between popular figure and stan is a particularly nuanced one.

For what it’s worth, Dream has also taken a much more firm stance against inappropriate subcultures of his fandom on his alternate account, DreamWasTaken. It remains to be seen whether or not that will be enough to satisfy his critics, but the situation is obviously a contentious one.