ZooMaa Column: What went wrong and how we’ll bounce back at CoD Champs - Dexerto
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ZooMaa Column: What went wrong and how we’ll bounce back at CoD Champs

Published: 5/Aug/2020 22:00 Updated: 8/Sep/2020 15:07

by Tommy Paparatto

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With Merc Foregrip and 10mm banned from the MP5 for the New York Home Series, the New York Subliners won an event Championship and built a nine-map winning streak. That streak extended to 12 in the London Home Series, with 10mm reinstated, until New York was consecutively swept by the Dallas Empire and Paris Legion. In his second Dexerto column, Tommy ‘ZooMaa’ Paparatto analyzes New York’s struggles in London and how they can be overcome ahead of the Call of Duty League Playoffs. 

Before the New York home series, we wanted to come in and make a bang. Going in with a new meta, we changed roles around. The subs got worse, while the ARs got better, so Mack, one of our main subs, ended up being one of our main ARs. Donny, Mack, and Lamar were running ARs while Dylan and I ran the subs. 

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Getting someone like Mack, who can just run around and get kills, on an AR was good because he can play a do-whatever-you-want role, where he just goes wherever he needs to pick up kills. For me, as a sub, I realized there were certain things I couldn’t challenge and certain routes I couldn’t take anymore because the MP5 wasn’t as good. 

I just had to focus on playing smart and making sure I was taking the right routes so that I could get spawns for my team and do a little bit of the dirty work to help them out. With the MP5 not being as good, you wanna be sneaky, you wanna be moving around trying to finesse around the map, using your movement to your best advantage. 

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We had a nine-map winning streak going into the London Home Series, so we were very confident. But when you come off an event win, all eyes are on you so teams are watching your VODs and trying to steal or copy whatever you’re doing. And I think that’s exactly what happened, teams just watched us play and they saw what we do, or how we play, and they blind-countered us, especially in SND. 

What happened in London?

A little too much confidence

We were probably a little overconfident. We were doing things we shouldn’t have been doing, making mistakes we don’t normally make, and we got punished for it. Paris is a good team while Dallas has good chemistry and some of the best pacing in the league right now. There’s a lot of good teams in this league and they’re going to punish you for mistakes that you make.

In the respawns, I just felt like we weren’t on point as a unit. Our communication was off and we were too slow to our spots, we weren’t the oiled machine that we usually are. In SND, we got blind-countered for sure here and there. But that’s on us, we know that they’re watching our film, we should be picking up on that.

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The meta shift

Another thing with the London Series was the meta change. From New York to London, 10mm was brought back, which made the MP5 a little bit better. So, instead of three ARs, it started to become more of a two-AR meta. 

We were going through a little meta crisis and thought maybe our pacing was a bit off. So, in the middle of the London Series, we ended up making a switch where we put Donny back on the AR. One thing with our team is keeping up the pace and making sure we’re constantly applying that pressure on other teams. So we felt, because of Mack’s fast playstyle, that Donny should be on the M4 because it might fit better. 

We had some people switching guns, some people feeling uncomfortable on certain guns, so we just tried to make everybody feel as comfortable as possible. It didn’t work out that weekend, we had a bad weekend of CoD. And that happens. As a professional who’s been doing this for years, you go through ups and downs. CoD is CoD. It’s day by day. With anything you do you’re going to have good days and bad days, so you have to just learn from the bad days and try to move forward.

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Looking forward to CDL Champs

Trying to figure out what fits best for our team is going to be important in this new meta. It didn’t look too good for us in London, but we have so much talent on the team and we already won an event so we know we can do it again. We just need to figure out the formula. 

The MP5 is harder to use now and the M4 can pretty much do it all, so the MP5 to me in this game, going into Champs, is more of a dirty work type gun.

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You’re the dirty work player, trying to get the spawns, hit the pinches, and hit the long routes. Of course, you can still go off and get a bunch of kills, but the M4s are going to be the ones dropping big stats. 

We’re going back into scrimmages now and trying different things out, including Mack back on the AR. If we get smacked because we weren’t taking practice seriously and acting cocky as hell because we won a tournament, well…that would be annoying. 

But that’s not going to happen. We’re disciplined and passionate. We take this stuff very seriously. We get on every single day, practicing, watching film with the team, we’re ready to go. We’re preparing for this and we really want to show out. Hopefully we do.

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H3CZ acquires OpTic Gaming from Immortals: Report

Published: 1/Oct/2020 16:30 Updated: 1/Oct/2020 17:40

by Jacob Hale

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Hector ‘H3CZ’ Rodriguez has reportedly acquired OpTic Gaming in a deal separate from his ties with NRG Esports, where he currently serves as co-CEO.

The deal reportedly sees H3CZ set to occupy the Los Angeles Call of Duty League spot held by OpTic Gaming, an organization he created and built before its sale in June 2019, in which Immortals Gaming Club acquired OpTic parent company, Infinite, in a deal valued at around $100m.

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According to Esports Observer, the acquisition is still pending League approval, and H3CZ himself “intends to divest to interested esports organizations.” This is likely a compulsory step due to ownership rules of the CDL preventing H3CZ having ownership in more than one team in the league.

As the original report says, “sources close to the deal have come forward stating that after negotiations spanning a little over a month, Rodriguez purchased the OpTic Gaming IP in its entirety.”

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H3CZ HuntsmenH3CZ currently serves as co-CEO of NRG Esports and their CDL team, Chicago Huntsmen.

This would mean that H3CZ owns every asset and resource under the OpTic Gaming umbrella, and that negotiations likely started taking place around the time of the Call of Duty League Championship in late-August.

His ties with Chicago Huntsmen are expected to remain intact, so where the CDL spot occupied by OpTic Gaming Los Angeles goes remains to be seen, though commissioner Johanna Faries has recently insisted that there is “great demand” for expansion slots — so one lucky team might just get their wish.

Naturally, fans want to see the likes of Nadeshot and his 100 Thieves organization find his way back into the Call of Duty League, but after his decision not to buy-in at the start of its inaugural year, it’s impossible to speculate whether he would have had a change of heart since then.

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We have reached out to H3CZ for comment.