Bizarre League of Legends bug gives Ahri one of Rek’Sai's best skills - Dexerto
League of Legends

Bizarre League of Legends bug gives Ahri one of Rek’Sai’s best skills

Published: 28/Jan/2020 13:02

by Kamil Malinowski

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A League of Legends player showed off an incredibly strange bug that caused Ahri to burrow underground, effectively turning her into Rek’Sai. 

Just like any game, League of Legends has seen its fair share of bugs. Things unexpectedly go wrong and something that should be possible happens – it’s not normally a big deal, but it can be quite entertaining.

Not long ago, a player shared an amusing bug with Lee Sin, which caused him to fly into space. The opposite seems to have happened now, as Ahri somehow managed to burrow underground, strangely copying Rek’Sai’s unique design.

KDA Ahri Prestige skin for League of Legends
Riot Games
Ahri the nine-tailed fox is one of the most popular League of Legend’s Champions.

Reddit user jhirakawa211 shared the weird glitch on January 27, and it’s quite a sight to behold. The normally flashy and extravagant nine-tailed fox burrowed underground after each attack, becoming just a colorful blob.

The players involved didn’t seem too bothered by the bug and were actually laughing as Ahri glided underground. She could still do everything normally, so the glitch was likely just a visual one, albeit fairly confusing.

Other Redditors absolutely loved the bug, with jokes and comments like “When I drink too much and I think I go to bed with an “Ahri”, but I wake up next to a “Rek’sai” and “This is one of the funniest bugs I’ve seen” filling the thread.

My gf’s ahri became reksai from leagueoflegends

User surgex even shared a similar bug they had had with Pantheon, where they similarly burrowed underground and would glide around the map, only popping out to attack.

It’s unknown what causes the bug, but it doesn’t seem to have a huge effect on the game. Although the burrowed champions may be a bit harder to click, they still have to pop out to attack and go back to their normal size.

Riot Games have not yet commented on the issue, and with how rare it seems to be, it may be a while until they get around to fixing it.

League of Legends

Doublelift reveals internal issues behind TSM’s collapse at Worlds 2020

Published: 25/Oct/2020 11:48

by Luke Edwards

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TSM AD carry Yiliang ‘Doublelift’ Peng has criticized his team’s “undisciplined” scrim play which led to their horrendous 0-6 run at Worlds 2020.

TSM went into Worlds as the LCS first seed, hoping to reach the knockout stage for the first time since 2014. Drawn into a group with Fnatic, LGD, and Gen.G, TSM wasn’t necessarily expected to progress from their group, but fans believed they could at least take a game or two.

But TSM limped out without a win, and the fallout has been huge. Long-time midlaner Bjergsen announced his retirement yesterday, with his move to head coach likely to kick off a revamp of the side.

As TSM’s most senior player, Doublelift took some time on his stream to offer fans more insight on what went wrong for them at Worlds this year.

Doublelift playing for TSM
Riot Games
Doublelift has offered his insight into TSM’s abysmal Worlds 2020 showing.

Speaking on his Twitch stream, Peng explained: “Losing trust in each other made us play even worse. After the first week, we probably had a 10% win rate in scrims. I was grateful to win even a single game per day. A lot of the games were either over after level one, or in the first five minutes.

“People on the team started ruining practice by coin flipping and playing stupidly. You need some discipline to stay focused on the goals. We lost all of our team play.”

TSM’s trust issues

As LCS analyst MarkZ pointed out, TSM’s performance was statistically the worst ever produced by a pool one team.

The communication issues were evident through some bizarre pieces of play. Rookie jungler Spica produced one of the most memorable plays of the tournament, but not for the right reasons.

His “nine-man” Lillia sleep was not only heavily memed by the community, it also provided a perfect example of TSM’s loss of confidence and lack of trust in each other.

A fully confident TSM likely would have followed in on Spica’s engage to win the fight and potentially take the game. Bjergsen’s first task will be to build up the confidence of whatever roster he has at his disposal.

TSM finds itself with a lot of work to do if it hopes to end a torrid run of international performances.