Red Reserve Have Cut Ties with their Red House Content Team Due to Rotting Relationships - "Some of these creators seemed to have a sense of entitlement" - Dexerto
Gaming

Red Reserve Have Cut Ties with their Red House Content Team Due to Rotting Relationships – “Some of these creators seemed to have a sense of entitlement”

Published: 9/May/2018 3:42 Updated: 11/Mar/2019 12:50

by Albert Petrosyan

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European based esports organization Red Reserve have announced the release of their content creation team known as the Red House.

The org’s management team released a long post on May 8th explaining the circumstances that led to the decision, and their plan moving forward.

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Before Red Reserve was purchased by Orbit Esport to become a legitimate esports organization, it was a group of content creators that focused on sniping montages.

Their merger in February of 2017 brought a lot of promise for both parties, which was seemingly made more certain after everyone starting working so well together.

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Red would now have the ability to enter into the booming esports market and Orbit now had a strong fan-base and structure to support their esports teams. Operations ran smoothly for the first few months, teams were performing at a high-level, the creators were creating consistent content, working together, and growing.

The post continues to say that while it had been apparently agreed that the content creators would no longer hold any management power in the company, problems began arising when revenue and success started piling in.

However, when sponsor revenue started to flow in, the relationship between specific creators and the company as a whole began to rot. Some of these creators seemed to have a sense of entitlement to the revenue coming into the company, stating that they’re the ones that built it and that they are the only reason that it stands. Through the coming months support from them started to disappear, meetings began to be missed, messages ignored, and communications became essentially non-existent.

Apparently, Red Reserve gave the content creators multiple chances to stay involved, but their continued lack of cooperation ultimately began costing the company.

Relationships with multiple sponsors were damaged due to the actions and noncompliance of all five content creators.

The post concludes with statements of finality, explaining that the decision to release the Red House was inevitable.

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We truly wish that we would not have to have come to this decision but after multiple attempts at bridging the gap between what is referred to as “the house” and “the company” we have come to the conclusion that this is the only way to move forward. We would like to thank all of you for your support and hope to continue to receive your support in our decision.

Original Red House member Alex ‘Formula’ and Jesse’ Rave had nothing but positive things to say following their release from the org.

 

However, former member Jordan ‘Randumb’ was not so held back when he tweeted his reaction following the announcement.

 

It appears that most of the Twitter reactions to the announcement are strongly negative, with many predicting that this will lead to a sharp decline for Red Reserve.

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It is very clear that they are currently going through a period of massive organizational changes and adjustments as they also unveiled their brand new logo and rebranding process earlier on the same day.

The organization will have to hope that their recent personnel decisions and rebranding project will be good enough to lead them to greater heights in the esports industry. 

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The entirety of Red Reserve’s announcement can be viewed below, or on the organization’s official website.

To the fans and followers of Red Reserve,

It is with a heavy heart that today we are announcing the release of the Red House. This has been a decision that has not been taken lightly but one that we feel is paramount in our success moving forward. This decision may raise a lot of questions from external sources due to the lack of transparency with our fans about the situation throughout these last few months. We feel that now is the correct time to shed light on these occurrences.

When the merger between Orbit Esports and Red Reserve occurred in February of 2017, both parties were delighted. Both parties saw the opportunity to flourish; Red would now have the ability to enter into the booming esports market and Orbit now had a strong fan-base and structure to support their esports teams. Operations ran smoothly for the first few months, teams were performing at a high-level, the creators were creating consistent content, working together, and growing. Sponsor interest started to rise and the future seemed bright.

During the merger it was made very clear to these creators that they were no longer management of the company, they sold a high majority stake and would stay onboard solely as content creators and ambassadors of the brand. However, when sponsor revenue started to flow in, the relationship between specific creators and the company as a whole began to rot. Some of these creators seemed to have a sense of entitlement to the revenue coming into the company, stating that they’re the ones that built it and that they are the only reason that it stands. Through the coming months support from them started to disappear, meetings began to be missed, messages ignored, and communications became essentially non-existent.

These creators were given multiple opportunities to stay involved and help Red succeed. Alex ‘Formula’ was given a management position within the organization. He was in charge of handling all content & streaming operations, bringing in new creators, and ensuring that a content schedule was followed. He did not perform well in his required duties. Relationships with multiple sponsors were damaged due to the actions and noncompliance of all five content creators.

We truly wish that we would not have to have come to this decision but after multiple attempts at bridging the gap between what is referred to as “the house” and “the company” we have come to the conclusion that this is the only way to move forward. We would like to thank all of you for your support and hope to continue to receive your support in our decision. We wish the best of luck to Alex ‘Formula’, John ‘Kiwiz’, Nick ‘Nickss’, and former Red House members, Jordan ‘Randumb’, Daniel ‘Gandhi’, and Jesse ‘Rave’. Rest assured that we will continue to grow the content side of Red Reserve including bringing in new creators through a recruitment challenge, supporting our current creators, and creating more of the Red content that you already love.

Thank you,

The Red Reserve Management Team

Overwatch

Jeff Kaplan reveals his ideal competitive Overwatch meta

Published: 8/Oct/2020 3:13

by Theo Salaun

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Blizzard Entertainment’s Vice President and Overwatch’s beloved Game Director Jeff Kaplan has revealed what he thinks is the ideal competitive meta for the expansive title.

Overwatch exists in many forms, from its highest ranks to its lowest, but the game’s competitive meta at the professional level has also varied greatly since the original release back in May 2016. 

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In the olden days, teams prioritized dive compositions led by Winston’s jumps and Tracer’s blinks. Then, in 2019, fans around the world either groaned or cheered as the divisive GOATS meta took center-stage, featuring a hefty squad built entirely with tanks and supports. 

Now, Kaplan is explaining his perspective on the game’s ideal state, following criticisms he levied back in July against the game’s double-shield reliance. Examining the game’s departure from a static, Orisa and Sigma-dependent environment, he dissects his compository ideology. 

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Brigitte stuns Junkrat on Volskaya
Blizzard Entertainment
Barriers have held an uncomfortably powerful role in Overwatch for a long time.

As discussed in an interview with the Loadout, Kaplan is both aware of the professional scene’s interests and the casual base’s tendencies. Coupling those factors, he believes the game is at its best when there is some blend of high skill caps and diverse team compositions.

“The most ideal, healthiest state of the game is when the meta is somewhat fluid, when the meta is more map dependent or team match up dependent than it is static. We’ve all seen those moments when the meta has been completely static and all six players will just play the same six heroes every time. I think that’s fun from a mastery standpoint, but I think it’s a lot more exciting for viewers when creativity and curiosity come into play,” he said.

When Kaplan refers to a “static” meta, the simplest example is 2019’s GOATS, where three healers (Brigitte, Lucio, and Moira) were coupled with three tanks (D.Va, Reinhardt, and Zarya) and would barrel into opponents.

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It took tremendous teamwork to be pulled off successfully against other professional teams, but many fans considered it more tedious than entertaining after months of gameplay.

In its current state, Overwatch is not completely balanced, but there is a degree of variety to it. That diversity seen in the Overwatch League spans downward into the casual ranks. Kaplan indicates that this is in line with his department’s hopes.

“I think most of our players would say in the ideal meta, all our heroes would be viable in some way competitively. I think as a competitive goal from a game designing and game balancing perspective that is extremely challenging, but it’s obviously what we strive to achieve.”

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While he assures that Overwatch would be completely balanced in an ideal world, in the meantime, his team would at least like to push toward a game that varies to some extent based on coaching, player preference, and map.

It remains to be seen if current and upcoming patches can accomplish that, but Kaplan’s emphasis on “fluidity” is a welcome driving force.

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