Twitch streamer Xposed smashes monitor in rage after losing MW2 SnD round - Dexerto
Entertainment

Twitch streamer Xposed smashes monitor in rage after losing MW2 SnD round

Published: 2/Apr/2019 9:06 Updated: 2/Apr/2019 9:29

by Calum Patterson

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Call of Duty streamer Xposed is known for flying off the handle when playing intense high roller wagers, and this time his two monitors faced the brunt of his rage after losing on Modern Warfare 2.

Who is Xposed?

Xposed is one of the most popular Call of Duty streamers outside of professional players, with over 100,000 followers, growing his stream through insane wager matches, and even more insane rages.

He’s also infamous for literally spitting on his camera after figuratively ‘spitting on’ his opponents in-game. He’s an acquired taste as a streamer, but clearly his fans enjoy his over the top reactions and rages, as he regularly pulls in hundreds, if not thousands, of viewers.

Twitch / XposedXposed mostly streams high roller Call of Duty wager matches on Twitch.

Xposed has been playing older Call of Duty titles, namely Modern Warfare 2 for much of March, but just because he isn’t playing the latest game doesn’t mean he’s taking it any less seriously.

On April 1, Xposed was playing 3v3 wager matches ranging from anywhere between $100 and $800 prize pots on Modern Warfare 2, but after being taken out by a semtex in only the second round, he lost his cool.

First throwing his controller and headset off, it appears the streamer threw his phone directly at his monitors, and then his chair got a beating too.

Removing his webcam from the monitor to show the damage, it was clear that both screens in his dual monitor setup had taken some damage.

After five minutes of cooling off, Xposed return to finish the match, but had to play on his faulty monitors, with almost half of the screen completely broken.

Unsurprisingly, his team lost the match and didn’t set up any other matches with Xposed’s monitors in no condition to do so. Although, given that he is streaming full time he’ll no doubt have a new set-up soon.

Entertainment

PewDiePie hits out at company over KSI Meme Review copyright claim

Published: 25/Nov/2020 21:25

by Brent Koepp

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Popular YouTuber Felix ‘PewDiePie’ Kjellberg was stunned after a company copyright claimed his Meme Review with JJ ‘KSI’ Olatunji. The Swede lost all the revenue for the upload due to their awful performance of “My Heart Will Go On” from Titanic. 

On November 22, PewDiePie teamed up with fellow YouTube star KSI for an epic Meme Review. The duo tackled everything from British culture to Olatunji’s boxing match with Logan Paul.

Kjellberg later revealed on Instagram that the popular video had been copyright claimed by a company. The personality called the move “bulls**t” after the corporation took all the revenue over their Titanic joke.

Screenshot of YouTubers PewDiePie and KSI playing instruments.
YouTube: PewDiePie
The YouTubers’ awful performance of My Heart Will Go On got the video claimed for copyright.

PewDiePie & KSI’s Meme Review copyright claimed

PewDiePie’s Meme Review with KSI was a major hit on the platform, pulling in over 7.3 million views in just a few days. Fans of both YouTube creators were treated to a hilarious collaboration. However, the duo’s “attempt” to perform My Heart Will Go On on a flute and alpine horn caused the video to get claimed.

Kjellberg revealed the issue on his Instagram story on November 25. “So I got a claim on my KSI video. At the end, we played My Heart Will Go On,” he said, before playing a clip of their awful performance to demonstrate how absurd the claim was. “It’s too similar!” he joked.

It turns out the YouTuber had appealed the claim, but was denied. “So I appealed it, because its bulls**t why, and they rejected it! This is actually infringing on copyright according to this company!” he exclaimed, before breaking into laughter.

The 31-year-old explained that the company was now going to get 100% of the money made off the popular upload. “So all the revenue now goes to this company for the entire video. Like, what? Yeah, I just thought it was bulls**t, I don’t even know.”

The whole scenario is made all the more ridiculous when you consider that the Titanic joke was only a few seconds in a 26 minute upload. The fact that the company now gets to own the entire video is a good example how YouTube’s content ID system can sometimes be flawed.