DrLupo is making his son play older video games - Dexerto
Entertainment

DrLupo is making his son play older video games

Published: 1/Nov/2018 19:55 Updated: 1/Nov/2018 19:56

by Virginia Glaze

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Popular Twitch streamer Ben ‘DrLupo’ Lupo admitted that he is making his son, Charlie, play though the older generation of games, as told in an interview with Business Insider on November 1.

Lupo feels that starting the younger generation of players with newer, high-definition titles will make them unappreciative of the advancement in technology and graphics.

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“If you stick a kid in front of all of these super-high-resolution games with tons of polygons – put him front of ‘Fortnite’ – he won’t appreciate back when it was 8-bit, and all the audio was done on MIDI,” Lupo said to BI.

He likewise wants his son to appreciate the history of gaming, itself, and claimed that he would make Charlie play the entire lineup of Nintendo’s titles before getting him started on newer games.

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“I want him to have an appreciation for the history of how I got to where I am now,” he continued. “He’ll play Nintendo’s entire lineup before he starts getting too crazy.”

Three-year-old Charlie has been featured on Lupo’s streams many times, and will likely take up Ben’s mantle of the ‘Lupo family business’ – should he choose to follow in his father’s footsteps. Lupo himself is open to the possibility of a family legacy in streaming, provided that Charlie looks to do ‘something positive’ with his intent.

Lupo isn’t the only one to have thought of a streaming family business, either. Notable streamer TimTheTatMan likewise mentioned something similar during a livestreamed gender reveal of his as-yet unborn son, where he joked that he might keep the name ‘Tim’ in the family for a probable streaming enterprise.

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Fitness

MattDoesFitness reveals the insane cost of his home gym renovation

Published: 8/Oct/2020 20:41

by Virginia Glaze

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British fitness guru and social media influencer Matt ‘MattDoesFitness’ Morsia has completely transformed his home gym — but the cost of the renovations was nothing to sneeze at.

Morsia is one of the fitness community’s biggest internet stars; boasting over 1.9 million subscribers on YouTube and 898,000 followers on Instagram, his honest approach to fitness and crazy physical challenges have earned him as substantial audience.

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Of course, it stands to reason that someone so dedicated to working out would have their own home gym (especially in a time where going to the gym could put one at risk) — but for Morsia, it’s more than just another room in his home.

For this influencer, the gym is his office, which he explained in the beginning of his video on the topic. He clarified that much of the equipment in his gym had been provided by his sponsors, and since it “directly contributes” to his salary, he chose only the most top-tier brands — something he claimed the average person does not need to do for their own home gym experience.

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That being said, Matt went on to reveal the exact cost of the space, and it’s enough to make your jaw drop to the floor (or at least a fair wince).

As for the building itself, he spent a grand total of £34,000 (or $43,979), which isn’t actually part of his house. Instead, he commissioned the space to be completely “built from scratch” in the back garden — further compounding on its comparison to a true office space.

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Combined with his equipment — the most expensive part of which was his £2,790 ($3,608) dual cable pulley — the entire gym ended up costing him £47,999 ($62,073). That’s nothing to sneeze at!

Morsia was quick to inform viewers that much of his equipment is no longer available for purchase due to the current global climate, and that other parts of the space — such as the bumper plates for his squat rack — were built by hand.

All in all, Morsia’s home gym is an impressive project that cost an equally impressive amount of cash, but when it’s your livelihood on the line, no price is too high for a quality workout.