CSGO's average player count breaks all-time record to kick-off new year - Dexerto
CS:GO

CSGO’s average player count breaks all-time record to kick-off new year

Published: 26/Jan/2020 17:05

by Andy Williams

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Valve’s Counter-Strike: Global Offensive has surpassed a major milestone for the first time as it approaches its eighth year as a premier esport.

CS:GO has stamped its place firmly as the gold-standard for first-person shooter esports. Despite being a multi-platform title, the vast majority of its player base stems from PC.

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While Valve’s flagship FPS has retained the traditional model of open circuit competition, the bridge between the casual and competitive gameplay is pivotal to its success.

CSGOs Operation Shattered Web.
Valve
Operation Shattered Web is Counter-Strike’s latest operation, since November 2017.

Even Seven years after CS:GO’s release, the player base is continuing to grow — and at a rapid rate. New content in Operation Shattered Web has pushed it to new levels of popularity in early 2020.

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On January 26, CS:GO surpassed half-a-million average players for the first time in the game’s history, after clocking 504,128 average players in a 30-day period. Data via Steam Charts.

Steamcharts' CS:GO statistics.
Steamcharts
There is a clear upward trend in Counter-Strike’s player statistics.

After a dip in player interest throughout the first half of 2019, Valve’s flagship FPS steadily crept its way back towards the major milestone. 

After a string of major tournaments and the release of Operation Shattered Web towards the backend of November, player interest spiked and Global Offensive smashed its previous all-time average player record.

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Steamcharts' CS:GO statistics.
Steamcharts
CS:GO surpassed half-a-million average players for the first time in its history.

A major part of this success is CS:GO’s renowned competitive play, with the Elo system at its core. Elo is a method of calculating a player’s skill level relative to their competitive environment, while counterbalancing for a player’s opponents strengths/weaknesses.

Put simply, it allows players to seamlessly transition between casual and competitive games. Meaning that the appeal (to an otherwise taboo game mode) is far greater, so ultimately more people are enticed to play.

On top of this, player interest is likely still overflowing from Valve’s decision to move to a free-to-play model back in December 2018.

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The peak concurrent viewership record of 850,485 still remains untouched from April 2016. However, with Valve’s new competitive schedule set to be implemented during the 2020 season, perhaps it’s only a matter of time before the previous record is broken.

CS:GO

Nadeshot frustrated as ESL shut down his restream of CSGO finals

Published: 19/Oct/2020 0:49 Updated: 19/Oct/2020 11:59

by Theo Salaun

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Ahead of 100 Thieves’ announced departure from Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Mathew ‘Nadeshot’ Haag came under a bit of fire for disinterest in his org’s finals match at IEM New York and, subsequently, admonished by ESL for streaming the event.

Nadeshot came home to Los Angeles after 12 hours of travel and was excited to stream some of the Black Ops Cold War open beta for the first time, but, as the stream started, he also mentioned that he wouldn’t be responding to chat as much as usual because 100T was facing Furia in the IEM New York Grand Finals.

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Unfortunately, some found it disappointing that the organization’s founder would multitask and play another game during his team’s final CS:GO match ever, with former pro Chad ‘SPUNJ’ Burchill even calling him out.

With people like SPUNJ discrediting Nade’s loyalty to his team and Black Ops Cold War coincidentally crashing, the 100T CEO attempted to switch over to the big match. But, in another string of disappointments, that idea wasn’t meant to be either.

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After trying to watch the Grand Finals with about 13,000 viewers, Nade received word that this re-stream was against ESL guidelines and that he was not allowed to do so.

Frustratedly, he returned to his initial Black Ops Cold War plans and expressed some understanding, as well as disappointment with the tournament organizers’ decision.

“At the end of the day, I get it from a business perspective on ESL’s standpoint,” Nadeshot said. “I mean, they pay for broadcast rights and they’re putting on this tournament and all these things.

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But, from my perspective, I have all of their sponsors and broadcast assets on my stream … I’m essentially just on a soapbox right now, blasting the stream but with just 12-13,000 more viewers.”

As he explained on stream, by putting the stream on full screen without any of his brandings, he felt that he was just giving the official broadcast more exposure. But, ultimately, he understands why the decision was made.

In a later clip, following his return to streaming BOCW, the 100T head honcho added further clarification.

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While affirming that he fully understands why he wasn’t allowed to re-stream the event and that he respects ESL’s business decisions, he felt that this situation was unique and could have been handled differently: “Well, I got your logos up here, I’ve got none of my sponsors up here. Can’t we just make an exception?”

First criticized for not giving his team’s play enough attention and then reprimanded for giving it too much attention, this wasn’t one of Nadeshot’s more fortunate streams. Still, he understands why ESL came down on him and, perhaps more importantly, he did eventually get to play BOCW without his PC crashing.

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