CS:GO: s1mple immediately regrets trusting teammate in clutch situation - Dexerto
CS:GO

CS:GO: s1mple immediately regrets trusting teammate in clutch situation

Published: 31/Jul/2019 11:04 Updated: 31/Jul/2019 11:30

by Kamil Malinowski

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Oleksandr ‘s1mple’ Kostyliev trusted his teammate’s word in a Counter-Strike: Global Offensive match and immediately paid the price. 

S1mple is widely regarded as the best CS:GO player in the world, competing with Natus Vincere and occasionally streaming his solo queue Faceit matches on Twitch. 

In one of these matches, the Ukrainian was left in a 1v1 with time quickly running out. He didn’t know the location of the last enemy, but his teammate was quick to help, pointing out where the final opponent was. S1mple believed him, only to be punished for it almost straight away. 

RFRSH EntertainmentS1mple has been a key part of NaVi’s success.

It all started with Na`Vi’s star player in a 1v4 on Mirage. He pushed the A-bomb site and quickly executed three opponents with his AK-47, before searching for the final Counter-Terrorist. He wasn’t able to find anyone, so he began to retreat to pick up the bomb. 

“Short, short, short! You see him!” shouted his teammate. S1mple, believing his newly-found ally, put his weapon away to sprint to the bomb, knowing if his opponent was on short, there was no way for him to be stopped. 

The Ukranian responded with “I believe you” as his character pounded his way to the bomb. Almost immediately after voicing his support to his comrade, S1mple turned the corner to A ramp, and was taken out by the final enemy who was waiting there, and definitely not on short. 

“I don’t know… sorry” was all that s1mple’s teammate could mutter out at that point, seemingly embarrassed by making the wrong call, meanwhile all the 21-year-old could do is sigh in annoyance.

While the Ukrainian seemed frustrated at the situation, his chat couldn’t help but enjoy it. Viewers immediately began to spam “LOL”, “short you see him” and “JeBaited” emojis, poking fun at his teammate’s incorrect call.

CS:GO

How to call a Technical Timeout in CSGO Competitive

Published: 28/Jan/2021 5:19

by Andrew Amos

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Valve has added Technical Timeouts to CS:GO Competitive in their January 27 update. It’s different from the game’s already-existing Tactical Timeouts. Here’s exactly how they work, and how you can call one for your team.

The addition of Technical Timeouts built into CS:GO comes as Valve has looked to revamp Competitive play by removing bots, and even adding bonus income for teams down on players.

It’s different from the already-existing Tactical Timeouts ⁠— which players can call once per half in a CS:GO Competitive game. In fact, you don’t really get an opportunity to call a tech pause, as they automatically go through.

Here’s how the new feature works, and how you can best utilize it to boot.

How to use Technical Timeouts in CS:GO

Technical Timeouts aren’t something you can call on command in CS:GO. In a matchmade competitive game, something has to go awry first.

Technical Timeouts can only be called if a player has disconnected from the game, and hasn’t reconnected by the time the next round starts. They will be automatically called, and will last two minutes at most. This allows the DC’d player time to reconnect to the game.

The timeout will automatically be canceled if the DC’d player abandons the game. Timeouts also won’t be called in a 4v5 if the player was kicked. Each team gets one Technical Timeout. It doesn’t count towards your Tactical Timeout count.

CS:GO Tactical Timeout menu
Valve
Tactical Timeouts have existed in CS:GO matchmaking for some time, but not tech pauses.

Hopefully you won’t ever have to use a Technical Timeout in CS:GO competitive queues. If it does come down to it though, it’s a handy tool that will allow players to get back into the game if their internet died or their game crashed.

In the downtime, you can talk strategies about tackling the game while a man down ⁠— or a man up. However, you won’t just be able to call it for your mouse glitching out, or a sticky desk mishap.