AMD Ryzen 7000 CPUs: Where to buy, price & more

AMD Ryzen Logo circling an AM5 CPUAMD

AMD Ryzen 7000 AM5 chips are almost here, so let’s break down everything from AM5 motherboards to what Zen 4 could bring.

The next crucial upgrade to AMD’s killer Ryzen line of CPUs is coming in the form of Zen 4, continuing the brand that changed AMD’s fortunes a few years ago.

Ryzen continues to be a game changer in the CPU field. Providing genuine competition for Intel’s stagnant releases, while also pushing forward what can be manufactured. AMD’s next chips, the Ryzen 7000 line looks to bring the next generation of PC gaming to a thunderous start, as DDR5 and PCIe 5.0 GPUs will be supported from the outset.

Article continues after ad

Watch the AMD Ryzen 7000 announcement

Contents:

Where to buy the Ryzen 7000 CPUs and how much it costs:

AMD Zen 4 Ryzen PriceAMD
  • Ryzen 9 7950X For $699
  • Ryzen 9 7900X For $549
  • Ryzen 7 7700X For $399
  • Ryzen 5 7600X For $299

Just hours before the announcement, the prices for the Ryzen 7000 lineup leaked. There was some surprised by the prices that got out there. Most saw it as hubris, as the cost of the CPUs during the Ryzen 5000 launch were also raised a fair margin.

However, the overall cost of the 7950X was $100 less than anticipated, with the smaller 7700X also coming in at a far reduced price. The 7950X was originally anticipated to cost $799, as the 5950X did previously.

The move could be seen as a way to ensure that enough people are making the leap from AM4 architecture to AM5.

Article continues after ad

Some people are surprised by the pricing, but the fact of the matter is, that these are the same prices as the previous generation.

You can find the Ryzen 7000 CPUs from the following stores:

AMD Ryzen 7000 CPU specs

Ryzen 5 7600XRyzen 7 7700XRyzen 9 7900XRyzen 9 7950X
Cores & Threads6C / 8T8C / 16T12C / 24T16C / 32T
Base clock4.7GHz4.5GHz4.7GHz4.5GHz
Boost clock5.3GHz5.4GHz5.6GHz5.7GHz
Cache38MB40MB76MB80MB
TDP105W105W170W170W
Price$299$399$549$699
Release dateSeptember 27September 27September 27September 27

As of right now, the specs we have mostly pertain to the 7950X, which will see RDNA 2 graphics on board, as well as a peak performance of 5.5GHz.

Luckily though, with leaks abound, plus some demos since the announcement at Computex in May, we know that the Ryzen 7000 is going to be powerful.

At their press conference, they announced the flagship CPU (presumably an upgrade from the 5950X) will core clocks of 5.5GHz – the highest that AMD has managed to reach – while also moving to the 5nm process. Smaller chips mean more can be fit on, which means more power.

Article continues after ad

In demos given, they demonstrated a Blender render outpacing the i9-12900K from Intel by 31%.

AMD Zen 4 Ryzen 7000 AM5 release date and delays:

At the event, AMD confirmed that the new Ryzen 7000 chips will launch on September 27. This backs up the rumors that were reported. According to a user on the Chiphell forums, because of a BIOS error, this might be the cause for the delay in the Ryzen 7000’s launch. According to the leak, the new date was set for September 27, which came true.

A BIOS error relates to the motherboard, which, if this is the case, could lead to a catastrophic launch of new buggy PCs and a lot of dead-on-arrival prebuilds.

Article continues after ad

Previously, it was believed that the AM5 chips would launch on September 15. As leaked by WCCFTech and wxnod on Twitter, a presentation in China revealed the original date.

According to Hardwareluxx, another reason for the delay could be due to the new addition of DDR5 RAM. In their report, it appears that introducing the new strain of technology has introduced a lot of unknown issues into the fray. While it should potentially be fixed for launch, we’re now expecting the delay to also be followed by a long and harsh launch for early adopters.

Is AMD expected to launch a Zen 4 APU?

The AMD Ryzen 7000 will come with an integrated RDNA 2 capable GPU on the chip, which should indicate that yes, there will be more Zen 4 APUs – as almost all of them appear to be one.

Article continues after ad

AMD’s APU market is thriving, as AMD appears to be crushing it with the low-tier, budget-friendly 5600G and 5700G. Their offerings on mobile aren’t any slouch either, but on desktop, it’s fully expected we’ll see a Zen 4 APU replacing the two other CPUs.

What is AMD Zen 4?

AMD Ryzen 7000 with Lisa SuAMD

Zen 4 is AMD’s next jump in power for their Zen architecture and will be used first in the Ryzen 7000 series of CPUs later this year.

It’ll be bringing new features to desktop PCs on AMD, with PCIe 5.0 and DDR5 support being key new points. It’ll also be swapping to a new motherboard type, the AM5, officially putting the years-long AM4 motherboards to bed.

Zen Ryzen explained

The Zen architecture is the brand name given to AMD’s CPUs, usually dubbed ‘Ryzen’. They’re split into a few groups, with different versions in each. Ryzen is for consumers, gaming enthusiasts, and so on. Most builds will recommend these over the other two, mostly down to convenience (price, acquisition, etc.).

These are split into 9, 7, 5, and 3, all offering their own core counts. Ryzen 9 is your absolute backbreaker, while Ryzen 3 can be found in your low-tier machine that just needs enough to get by.

After Zen 2, AMD began producing CPUs with integrated graphics, dubbed APUs, which allowed for a wider range of budget PCs to be built. A custom APU currently provides the Steam Deck with its capabilities.

Zen Ryzen Threadripper explained

There’s also Threadripper, which is intended for content creators. While good for gaming as well, these chips intend to bust apart content creation programs, giving them as much power as they need. The main difference is that the Threadripper chips can take on more PCIe lanes and more memory than their consumer counterpart.

These are excessive for consumers, so the pricing is usually kept far and away from the regular cost of the Ryzen chips to avoid the wrong person buying them.

Zen Epyc CPUs explained

For servers, the Epyc line is where you’ll see AMD come in. Epyc has the same benefits as Threadripper but is intended to be used inside servers, so it’ll support more cores for multitasking, while also providing a larger cache memory so it can retrieve things quicker on repeated use.

Zen+ might have fallen out of favor due to its age, but the Athlon series of CPUs still use them.

AM5 motherboards: AMD Ryzen 7000’s new design

Currently, AM4-based CPUs have all the pins housed on the chip itself. This lends itself to worry when fitting the CPU into the motherboard, as the pins could easily damage. Intel has for years now, kept the pins on the motherboard and you slap the CPU on and then enclose it inside.

AMD has taken note and will be updating their next line of AM5 boards, as well as the Zen 4 chips themselves, to keep the pins on the motherboard.

The different AM5 motherboards coming will support PCIe 5.0, but will be split into three groups.

AM5 motherboards explained

Zen 4 motherboardsAMD

The different AM5 motherboards that AMD and their partners will release will all come with their own caveats. Whether you choose to go all in or the budget option, could mean the difference in what you get out of the PC in the end.

  • X670 Extreme will provide users with extreme overclocking and PCIe 5.0 ‘everywhere’
    • The PCIe 5.0 everywhere bit probably means that it’ll have support on all lanes, rather than limited to your storage and GPU lanes.
  • X670 is your middle ground, the one you’d go for if you’re all in on ensuring you’re future-proofed but don’t need the expense of the Extreme models. PCIe 5.0 will be available on storage and graphics.
    • It is expected that the next line of high-end AMD GPUs, the RX 7900 XT, could be PCIe 5.0 only, leaving this the board of choice for those that want to be safe when Nvidia also decides to move that way.
  • B650 is the motherboard for budget – or normal human being – builds. While it has PCIe 5.0 for storage, the rest of the lanes will presumably be 3.0 or 4.0 equipped. These usually release after the fact, so we’ll be sure to keep you all updated once they release.

Can you use Ryzen 7000 CPU on AM4 motherboards?

No. AM4 has a different design entirely. If you’re intending on buying a Ryzen 5000 or Zen 3 (or below) chip, be sure to get the correct motherboard. They’re usually designated B550 or X570.

What is the 5nm process? AMD’s manufacturing explained

Zen 4 is not only the next step up in performance for AMD but also brings new advancements in the capabilities of how they build CPUs. The current race between Intel and AMD is to reach as small a nanometer as possible, allowing more to be crammed onto the CPU itself.

Intel, AMD, Qualcomm, and now Apple, have been in a bitter rivalry in trying to get to the smallest possible nanometer. Each individual piece of the CPU that they can cram onto the board inside means more performance in most cases. Apple currently plans to shift its way to 3nm, while AMD works on bringing the big guns via the 5nm process.

Meanwhile, Intel currently is stuck on the 10nm process – sort of. For years, Intel would not outsource their chips, resulting in the other companies leaping ahead as they used a company called TSMC to help develop their chips as small as possible. Now, Intel is playing catch up and even Raptor Lake looks to still be using the same process.

However, Intel does work a little differently, with their 10nm process almost equating to 7nm in the way that they manufacture things. The problem is, even though they’re on a technical 7nm, they’re still playing catch up to AMD’s 5nm. Though, with this year’s news of Intel potentially striking a deal for 3nm CPUs to be developed outside of their own fabrication plants, it could be a rough couple of years coming up.