League of Legends

When is the next League of Legends Clash tournament? Format, date, more

Published: 23/Mar/2020 5:35 Updated: 14/Jan/2021 1:52

by Andrew Amos

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Clash is here to stay in League of Legends, with the in-game tournament system a massive hit with players. Want to get in on the action yourself? We’ve got everything you need to know about signing up for the next bracket.

After years of testing and tinkering, Clash has finally arrived for good in League of Legends. The in-game tournament system pits players of equal skill together, and provides a more competitive environment than your standard ranked queue.

If you want to play Clash, but don’t know when the next bracket is, or how to sign-up, we’ve got everything you need to know so you can jump right into the action.

Riot Games
Get your mates together and get ready for the next Clash tournament soon.

What is Clash?

Clash is an in-game tournament system for League, acting as a replacement for the old Ranked Fives queue. It allows for teams to organize themselves to participate in monthly tournaments against teams of a similar skill level.

There are eight teams in every Clash bracket, thrown together in a single-elimination style bracket. If you lose the first game though, you’ll have a chance at redemption in the consolation bracket, so it’s not all bad news.

You’ll be seeded against teams with a similar rank in your tier. There are four tiers in Clash ⁠— going from Tier IV as the lowest to Tier I at the top ⁠— based on your team’s average ranking and previous Clash performances.

 

How to sign-up for Clash in League of Legends

Before you can jump into the action, you need to make sure your League account is eligible. If you have hit level 30, have verified your League account by SMS, and currently have a rank in either Solo or Flex queue, you can play Clash.

From there, you just need to find four other friends, and add them to your team in the Clash bracket of the client. You will all need to pay an entry fee with tickets.

When the dues have been paid, you’ll have to wait for your bracket to unlock on the day before you can start playing. You’ll need to sign-up for every tournament individually, so if you want to play multiple times a weekend, be sure to sign-up twice.

Riot Games
You’ll have the chance to name your team and design a logo for Clash.

When is the next Clash tournament in League of Legends?

The next Clash event, the Shadow Isles Cup, is the first of League Season 11. It’ll be running over only one weekend, but you don’t need to be ranked to play in it.

  • Day 1: January 16
  • Day 2: January 17

The next cup will be announced after the end of the Shadow Isles Cup.

 

Shadow Isles Clash tournament in League of Legends

What rewards are on offer for Clash?

Winning in Clash gives you Victory Points, which go towards unlocking a banner on your League profile.

On top of that, your banner will also display in your chosen lane on the Rift every time you load in. The more times you win, the better your banner will look.

If you claim a bracket all for yourself, you’ll also take home a trophy. These trophies will display on your profile, as well as on the Rift for two weeks.

Riot Games
The more games you win, the more decked out your banner becomes.

Regardless of result though, all players will receive a Clash Orb or Capsule, depending on whether they signed up with a regular ticket or a premium one.

More rewards are loaded into these depending on your result, with the premium capsule containing more goodies than the regular orb.

Skin shards, Clash logos, emotes, and more are jam-packed into each orb and capsule, however, so even if you bow out early, you’ll still get something.

League of Legends

Ablazeolive on his LCS call-up: “You have to take risks on younger talent”

Published: 19/Jan/2021 12:39 Updated: 19/Jan/2021 13:33

by Andrew Amos

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Golden Guardians’ new Mid Laner Nicholas ‘Ablazeolive’ Abbott isn’t a household name yet. While LCS 2021 expectations are low for the rookie squad, he has high hopes of proving pundits wrong.

Worlds 2020 ended on a sour note for North America, more so than any year previously. The region’s failures were being exposed on a platform like never before, and changes were needed.

As it was all going down in Shanghai, Ablazeolive was sitting back home, patiently waiting for a potential call-up to the LCS. Five years after he made his competitive debut in NACS with Zenith Esports, it finally came.

Abbott is one of three rookies Golden Guardians put faith in for LCS 2021. They didn’t take long to impress, beating CLG in their first game at Lock In. Despite the experience gap between the two squads, the youngsters looked like the veterans.

“I actually wasn’t as nervous as I thought I would be. I was a lot more nervous in my Academy debut. I’m not sure why, I’m still trying to figure that one out, but I felt really comfortable,” he told Dexerto.

Ablazeolive playing for Golden Guardians Academy in LCS 2020
Paul de Leon for Riot Games
It took five years and hundreds of Academy games to get his LCS call-up, but Ablazeolive is hungry to make up lost time.

The 22-year-old has been on the cusp of LCS stardom since 2016, but never actually got the go-ahead. It was taxing at times, but Ablazeolive never lost sight of that dream.

“I had a very positive outlook after 2019. I thought from when I was talking to people and their opinions of me, and my own interpretations of my own strength, I thought I was pretty likely to get into the LCS in 2020, and when that didn’t happen, I was pretty disappointed.

“Golden Guardians as an organization showed faith in me and saw the potential and took a chance on me — and I’m very glad that I’m able to show them they were right in choosing me as their Mid Laner.”

Shaped by Bjergsen

Although he never was on stage against the best, behind closed doors, he had the best mentor you could ask for ⁠— Soren ‘Bjergsen’ Bjerg. Two years on TSM Academy with the star Dane taught Ablazeolive not just invaluable lessons in-game, but off the Rift too.

“Naturally, he was really good in-game, and nobody would be surprised to know I learned a lot from him. However, the most important thing he taught me was to not be as nervous on stage. He showed me how to get over it, talked to me, and helped me work it out. I was very grateful for that,” he explained.

While he won’t get the chance to play against Bjerg on stage after his retirement, Abbott isn’t concerned about not giving his tutor a send-off. Instead, he’s trying to build the same reputation himself.

“I like to think he retired because of me. He started out as this unreachable goal and I didn’t know how I could improve and get better than him. While it’s sad I won’t be able to play him, I’m not upset. I’d still feel confident against him, like I’d be confident against any other Mid Laner.”

Ablazeolive playing for TSM Academy in LCS 2019
Colin Young-Wolff for Riot Games
Ablazeolive won LCS Academy Spring 2019 on TSM Academy while under Bjergsen’s wing.

LCS 2021: Year of the rookies?

Ablazeolive is trying to turn around the perception of NA Mid Laners as a whole too. There’s been a distinct shift in the NA mindset this off-season — away from importing every half-decent European player. Instead, the focus has become on local, homegrown talent.

Golden Guardians is the epitome of that, but they’re far from the exception. Immortals, Dignitas, and FlyQuest have all done the same. This is especially true in the Mid Lane, with six North Americans finally outnumbering their European counterparts for the first time in years. This investment in Academy players, in Ablazeolive’s eyes, is the only way NA can redeem themselves internationally.

“That’s the only way NA can rebuild itself. Relying on imports and other regions to supply our good players isn’t going to be a realistic strategy to become dominant or even competitive at Worlds. You have to be able to take these risks on these younger talent, and I think this year, a lot of teams have done that which is very surprising,” he said.

“It’s great that we have so many [Academy Mids] coming up, because it’s always been a meme that NA Mids are really bad, but it’s also because no one tries to play them. Maybe if we play and get the exposure and practice, then we can show our improvement.”

Ablazeolive playing for Golden Guardians Academy in LCS 2020
Colin Young-Wolff for Riot Games
Worlds isn’t on the horizon yet for Ablazeolive. However, LCS playoffs are.

All eyes on LCS 2021 Playoffs

It’s a long-term plan, but it’s one that ultimately could shift where NA ends up in the global power rankings. Worlds might seem like a distant dream for Ablazeolive for now, but he’s at least confident Golden Guardians can defy expectations and really show what homegrown talent can do.

“A lot of people aren’t expecting us to make Playoffs, but personally from scrims and how we’ve been playing, I’d actually be quite surprised if we didn’t make Playoffs. A lot of the teams, at least starting off, don’t look like they’re fully together yet.

“This isn’t going to be the same Golden Guardians in five months, or three months. We’re going to get better ⁠— the difference between us at the beginning of scrims and now is mind-blowing, and that’s very directly attributed to our coaching staff helping us out individually and as a team.”

Golden Guardians next play against the top-of-the-table 100 Thieves on Friday, January 22 at 4PM PT.