Twitch is Replacing the 'IRL' and 'Creative' Sections With 10 New Categories, Including Special Section For 'ASMR' - Dexerto
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Twitch is Replacing the ‘IRL’ and ‘Creative’ Sections With 10 New Categories, Including Special Section For ‘ASMR’

Published: 10/Aug/2018 0:03 Updated: 10/Aug/2018 0:09

by Albert Petrosyan

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Twitch has announced that it will be removing the IRL and Creative categories from the streaming directory.

The popular streaming platform will be adding ten new categories in their place, which will provide a more specific description of the content being streamed.

The decision to reform the IRL and Creative sections was announced by Twitch on August 9, and will be implemented sometime in mid-September.

In mid-September we will remove IRL and Creative as categories and add more than 10 new categories, which will let you better describe the content of your streams. These categories will be added to the Browse page, which will be updated to show gaming and non-gaming categories in a single view.

  • Art – For all the artists creating paintings, illustrations, animation, comics, photography, and more, whether you’re using digital or traditional methods or techniques.
  • Hobbies & Crafts – Use this category when you’re crafting real world objects or working on DIY projects. Includes making costumes, sewing, sculpture, LEGO, woodwork, metalwork, and more.
  • Food & Drink – From cooking to eating and everything in between, this category is for anything related to the creation, culture, or consumption of food and drinks.
  • Music & Performing Arts – Use this category when you’re dancing, singing, composing music, playing an instrument, and more.
  • Beauty & Body Art – Use this category when you’re streaming makeup, skincare, bodypainting, tattooing, and more.
  • Science & Technology – Use this category when you’re streaming activities like software development, game design, science experiments, engineering, or robotics.
  • Just Chatting – This category is for conversations between streamers and viewers, like when you’re warming up at the start of your stream, doing Q&As, or live vlogging.
  • Travel & Outdoors – Whether you’re exploring a new city or just hanging out in your hometown, this category covers all your walking-and-talking needs.
  • Sports & Fitness – From team sports to training solo, this category includes everything you’d do in a gym and more.
  • Tabletop RPGs – Finally a place to stream all the tabletop RPGs you love.
  • Special Events – This is where you’ll find big events like TwitchCon, E3, and PAX, as well as special announcements from game developers and publishers.
  • Talk Shows & Podcasts – This category name gets an update for all the podcasters out there.
  • ASMR – A centralized place for ASMR content.

As for why the the two major categories are being broken down into ten, Twitch has explained that they were too broad and did not do well in accurately describing the contents of the streams in those sections.

  • Creative and IRL have become catch-all categories that don’t help describe the content of a stream
  • New categories give you more accurate ways to describe your stream and help viewers find you

In addition to his announcement, Twitch has also said that Communities will also be disabled and replaced with new Tags, which will more accurately describe streams in directory pages, on the homepage, in search and channel pages, and more.

How Do Tags Work?

  • Tags will describe your stream everywhere viewers can find it: directory pages, the homepage, search, channel pages, etc.
  • Tags will be shown alongside your video thumbnail, stream title, and the game or category you’re streaming
  • Directory pages and the Browse page will be updated to let viewers filter by tags.
  • Each time you go live, you can select tags on your live dashboard to describe that day’s stream
  • Most tags will be manually selected by you, but some will be automatically applied by Twitch – For example: we’ll apply genres to games, and we may apply tags for certain in-game features we automatically detect.
  • Tags will not be user-generated, but you will be able to suggest new tags.
  • Tags are not tied to a specific game or category. You can select whichever tags describe your stream best, whether you’re playing a game or streaming non-gaming content.
  • Tags are meant to be objective, but we realize not all self-identifications are objective. As a result, we will work with streamer communities, starting with our active LGBTQ+ community, to identify how self-identification should be integrated into tags. You will see an LGBTQ+ tag reflected in the list of tags available in September, and we look forward to hearing feedback from streamers on how we can incorporate self-identification into tags.

This feature is also scheduled to go live mid-September, and the initial list of tags that will be available can be found by clicking here.


The full announcement for replacing the IRL and Creative sections can be viewed below:

Add new streaming categories that are more specific than IRL and Creative

What Is It?

With so many streamers on Twitch, we need to give you better ways to describe your stream when you go live.

In mid-September we will remove IRL and Creative as categories and add more than 10 new categories, which will let you better describe the content of your streams. These categories will be added to the Browse page, which will be updated to show gaming and non-gaming categories in a single view. You can see the list of categories below, and share your feedback or suggestions for additional categories here.

We are also saying goodbye to Communities and introducing Tags, which will let you describe your stream in even more detail beyond the category you’re streaming. Learn more about Tags and Communities here.

These are the new categories we plan to add:

  • Art – For all the artists creating paintings, illustrations, animation, comics, photography, and more, whether you’re using digital or traditional methods or techniques.
  • Hobbies & Crafts – Use this category when you’re crafting real world objects or working on DIY projects. Includes making costumes, sewing, sculpture, LEGO, woodwork, metalwork, and more.
  • Food & Drink – From cooking to eating and everything in between, this category is for anything related to the creation, culture, or consumption of food and drinks.
  • Music & Performing Arts – Use this category when you’re dancing, singing, composing music, playing an instrument, and more.
  • Beauty & Body Art – Use this category when you’re streaming makeup, skincare, bodypainting, tattooing, and more.
  • Science & Technology – Use this category when you’re streaming activities like software development, game design, science experiments, engineering, or robotics.
  • Just Chatting – This category is for conversations between streamers and viewers, like when you’re warming up at the start of your stream, doing Q&As, or live vlogging.
  • Travel & Outdoors – Whether you’re exploring a new city or just hanging out in your hometown, this category covers all your walking-and-talking needs.
  • Sports & Fitness – From team sports to training solo, this category includes everything you’d do in a gym and more.
  • Tabletop RPGs – Finally a place to stream all the tabletop RPGs you love.
  • Special Events – This is where you’ll find big events like TwitchCon, E3, and PAX, as well as special announcements from game developers and publishers.
  • Talk Shows & Podcasts – This category name gets an update for all the podcasters out there.
  • ASMR – A centralized place for ASMR content.

Why?

Why combine games with non-gaming categories?

  • We learned from Communities that having multiple directories made it harder for non-gaming streamers to build an audience and prevented streamers from exploring the full range of content they were interested in streaming.
  • Combining games and non-gaming categories into one directory improves visibility for non-gaming streamers.
  • Tags will let viewers filter for the categories and streams they’re interested in watching, which makes a mixed directory more manageable.

Why split up IRL and Creative?

  • Creative and IRL have become catch-all categories that don’t help describe the content of a stream
  • New categories give you more accurate ways to describe your stream and help viewers find you
  • Tags will let you add even more detail beyond the category you’re streaming

Timing

We are targeting mid-September, but this timing is subject to change.

We will regularly update this card when we have more information to share.

More Info

We’re also introducing Tags. Learn More.

Tune in to our next Discovery Updates live stream at 2 pm Pacific Friday, August 24– right after Twitch Weekly. The team working on this project will be there to answer your questions and share the latest updates.

Have Questions about this project?

Send us your questions right here.

We’ll answer frequently asked questions on this card and our discovery updates live streams.

General

Police hunt for suspect after hoax hostage situation at Ubisoft Montreal

Published: 13/Nov/2020 19:45 Updated: 14/Nov/2020 0:37

by Theo Salaun

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Reports indicate that there is an ongoing hostage situation involving dozens of people at Ubisoft Montreal’s headquarters in the Mile-End neighborhood of Montreal, Quebec. There have been no confirmed injuries.

Update (7:35 p.m. ET): Ubisoft Montreal have released a statement regarding the hostage situation. “We are extremely relieved this was resolved without incident and we’d like to thank you all for your support and kind words.”

No injuries were reported at the offices. Montreal Police are launching a full investigation into the call.

Update (5:04 p.m. ET): All of the Ubisoft Montreal’s building occupants are being safely evacuated by Montreal’s police force and the police have joined local news in suggesting that the situation was, in fact, a hoax perpetrated by a call within the Ubisoft headquarters. No suspect has been identified or apprehended at this point, but the SPVM are actively investigating.

Update (4:04 p.m. ET): While local news outlets are reporting that the hostage situation was a hoax, Montreal’s police force have indeed confirmed that there appears to be no active threat and that the building’s occupants are being evacuated.

Update (3:33 p.m. ET): Little is known about the police force’s ongoing activity in attempts to enter the building, but CTV News reports that Ubisoft’s employees have been told, via company memo, to “hide in an area that locks and to keep quiet.”

Update (3:00 p.m. ET): Heavily armed Montreal police tactical units are approaching the building and preparing to make entry. Dozens of employees remain on roof and no injuries or negotiations with the suspects have been reported thus far.

Update (November 13, 2020 at 2:49 p.m. ET): Police appear to have barricaded off the daycare at Ubisoft Montreal’s headquarters, at least 50 employees have barricaded themselves atop the building’s roof, and tactical police units have blocked off surrounding streets and appear to be preparing to make entry. Current reports indicate that there have been no injuries thus far, according to local news on the scene.

With numerous reports and tweets from local news and Ubisoft Montreal employees, respectively, it appears that a hostage situation is unfolding at the company’s headquarters but that all employees are safe. 

In the afternoon, it was reported by Quebec’s TVA Nouvelles that dozens of hostages were being held at Ubisoft Montreal’s building on Saint Laurent Boulevard. This ongoing situation was echoed by Montreal’s police department, who put out public announcements to avoid the area due to the police’s efforts there.

Shortly after, numerous employees, including Programming Project Lead Gavin Young and a Production Marketer for Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla, tweeted that they were indeed safe and sound despite what was happening in the building.

Although ‘Valskuiken’ tweeted that they would be going home, it appears that a large conglomerate of employees have made their ways to the building’s roof and have barricaded themselves up there by blocking off the door to the exterior.

Further, reports from TVA Nouvelles indicate that a ransom request has been made by the suspects, but it is unclear what has come of it as police continue to operate in the vicinity.

At present, it appears that numerous employees are safe but it is unclear what is precisely happening with the situation given the multi-floor building’s space and large occupancy. At least 50 employees have made it to the roof, wherereports show they are holding up safely. However, in anticipation of the police force making entry into the building, it seems that ambulances and a tactical police force are arriving to the scene.

As reports indicate, the tactical forces approaching the building include numerous police officers, tactical police units, and heavier vehicles. There have been no indications of injuries thus far, so it appears that the ambulances are predominantly a precautionary measure.

We will be continuing to update this page with updates as they come in and as the Montreal police force and local news provide information to the public about the current circumstances.