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Fortnite Battle Royale • Nov 20, 2018

Scrubs actor reveals his thoughts on Fortnite using his dance - "They jacked that s***"

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Scrubs actor reveals his thoughts on Fortnite using his dance - "They jacked that s***"

Scrubs star Donald Faison once performed a now iconic dance on an episode of the medical comedy-drama, which many people of the younger generation now recognize as the Fortnite dance.

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Although players in Fortnite Battle Royale have their choice of countless dances and emotes to use, when the game first released in September 2017, all players were given one default dance.

This was in fact the dance which Faison had improvized on the episode 'My Half Acre' in the show's fifth season.

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During a reunion of the Scrubs cast, coming together for the first time since the show ended in 2010, where the topic of Faison's dance being reincarnated in the world's most popular game came up.

However, despite now being made so iconic and performed by children in school all over the world as they show off their favorite Fortnite dances to friends, Faison isn't receiving any royalties for his creation.

Faison told the crowd that someone had reached out to him from Epic Games about using the 'choreography', which prompted the crowd to ask him to perform it for them, to which he responded "If you want to see it, you can play Fortnite, because they jacked that shit!"

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Faison is not the only dance creator who has gone unrewarded by Epic for using his dances in game, with a host of music artists having their own iconic dances used without royalties being paid.

Hip-Hop artist Chance the Rapper previously called out Epic Games for using the work of 'black creatives' without paying them for it, arguing that the real songs should be used in order to pay the artists for their creation.

Rapper 2 Milly also said he was planning to sue Epic Games for the use of his 'Milly Rock' dance, although the legal precedent for such a case is not clear.