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Fortnite Battle Royale • Aug 22, 2018

Ninja Explains Why Epic Games Would Never Allow Stretch Resolutions in Fortnite Tournaments

Ninja Explains Why Epic Games Would Never Allow Stretch Resolutions in Fortnite Tournaments

Top Fortnite streamer Tyler "Ninja" Blevins has explained why he thinks playing on a stretched resolution isn't the right idea for competitive players, as Epic will never allow it at tournaments.

There has been a trend recently of competitive Fortnite players and streamers using a stretched resolution, as it makes character models appear wider and therefore, in theory, easier to target, but many have been reverting back to the default.

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FaZe Clan pro player and streamer Turner "Tfue" Tenney for example, was one of the most high profile players to use a stretched resolution, but recently made the switch back.

TSM's Ali "Myth" Kabbani similarly used a stretched resolution, but has reverted to 1920x1080, for the upcoming PAX West $1.5 million tournament.

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As Ninja explains, using a different resolution from the standard while practicing won't help when players get to these tournaments, because Epic Games will undoubtedly enforce the standard for broadcast purposes.

"All the stretched pros, that are now switching back to native resolution, that's one of the main reasons I never changed off the default res.

Do you honestly think that Epic is going to let you run that disgustingly ugly stretched res on their tournaments and their capture cards? When they are trying to broadcast it to the millions of people who will have no idea why the resolution looks so bad?"

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The upcoming tournament at PAX West, starting August 31, with qualifiers being played for the first three days of competition, and the final qualifiers will be streamed "across all Fortnite channels".

So Twitch, YouTube, Mixer, Twitter and Facebook will all be broadcasting the matches, and as Ninja explains, Epic Games will want the game looking as good as possible for the millions of viewers that undoubtedly tune in. Using a stretched resolution may be jarring for many casual viewers.

It will be only Fortnite's second developer supported LAN (offline) tournament, following their first outing for the Pro-Am tournament at E3. This time however, anyone can sign up and qualify, not just invited guests and star players.

You can find out more about the $1.5 million Fortnite Tournament at PAX West here.

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Epic Games, Ninja