KEEMSTAR Explains Why Friday Fortnite is Unlikely to Come Back, Despite Fans Hitting His Retweet Goal [UPDATED] - Dexerto
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KEEMSTAR Explains Why Friday Fortnite is Unlikely to Come Back, Despite Fans Hitting His Retweet Goal [UPDATED]

Published: 10/Sep/2018 22:51 Updated: 12/Sep/2018 12:11

by Albert Petrosyan

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UPDATE

With the return of Friday Fortnite looking ever more unlikely, KEEMSTAR has revealed revealed that he is considering a move to one of Fortnite’s biggest competitors


Original article…

It looks as though fans of the popular ‘Friday Fortnite’ competition are in store for some bad news, as the popular competition apparently won’t be returning after all.

YouTuber Daniel ‘KEEMSTAR’ Keem, the creator of Friday Fortnite, has hinted that the competition will likely not be returning, despite him having earlier announced that he was working towards bringing it back.

The ‘DramaAlert’ host posted this update on his Twitter page on September 10.

Nope! I’m not playing this game again. RiP #FridayFortnite !

KEEMSTAR, Twitter

It would appear that this sudden change of heart is due to Epic Games announcing another major Fortnite competition – this one a $10 million, six-week long tournament series called ‘Fall Skirmish.’

Of course the reason why KEEMSTAR had cancelled Friday Fortnite after 10 consecutive weeks was due to Epic’s previous competition – the eight-week ‘Summer Skirmish.’ 

Because the Summer Skirmish featured prize pools that were exponentially larger than the $20,000 awarded weekly in Friday Fortnite, many big-name participants chose to play in Epic’s event rather than Keem’s. 

With the Summer Skirmish having wrapped up last weekend, the YouTuber announced that he would bring back his popular competition if his tweet hit 100K retweets in a week.

Clearly the community wanted Friday Fortnite back as the goal was met in just over a day, however this latest development appears to have proved their efforts for naught.

KEEMSTAR doesn’t appear ready to give up yet however, as he has publicly attempted to negotiate with Epic to move their event days to the weekend, allowing him to run his competition on Fridays. 

However, his efforts could prove futile once again, as he had attempted something similar with Epic prior to the Summer Skirmish but his pleas fell do deaf ears and were ignored.

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Epic Games sues Apple & Google in UK over Fortnite removals

Published: 16/Jan/2021 1:28

by Theo Salaun

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Following litigation over Fortnite’s app store removals by Apple and Google in the United States of America, Epic Games have officially mounted lawsuits against both tech companies in the United Kingdom, as well.

In August 2020, Epic Games added their own payment process to Fortnite’s mobile offerings so that Apple and Google’s cellphone and tablet users could purchase in-game items at a discounted price. This discount was specifically enabled by the new process, which bypassed each company’s transaction fees. 

Unsurprisingly, as the payment method was in direct violation of both the App Store and Play Store’s Terms of Services, each company subsequently removed Fornite from their offerings. And, expecting this, Epic Games responded by launching lawsuits against the companies in the U.S. and Australia. 

Now, the makers behind the world’s most popular third-person battle royale have tripled down and mounted legal action against both tech giants in the U.K. Citing violations of competition laws, Epic Games’ legal case in the U.K. is very similar to the ones already made in other countries. And, immediately contested, Apple and Google’s responses have proved similar, as well.

Fortnite Crew image
Epic Games
Fortnite’s Crew subscription service means even more payments for Epic Games.

As discussed by BBC News, Epic have officially submitted documents to the Competition Appeal Tribunal in the UK. The allegations suggest a monopolistic abuse of power by each company that centers around competitive restrictions to app store and payment processing options, as well as unfair payment fees.

Typically, those fees come at about 30 percent of all purchases, although exact figures differ depending on company and app. Fortnite is obviously one of the biggest games in the entire world, so almost one-third of their sales on mobile means hefty earnings.

But, like their other lawsuits, Epic allege that this is about more than their own profits. The company demands that Apple and Google begin allowing software developers to institute their own payment-processing systems and options to be downloaded outside of the App and Play stores.

Fortnite Crew Green Arrow
Epic Games
Fortnite has always delighted its fanbase with purchasable cosmetics.

So far, Apple and Google have both replied similarly in the U.K. situation, claiming that they are open to reintroducing Fortnite to their mobile stores but that they deny any violation of competitiveness.

Dexerto will continue to monitor the legal cases in each country, providing updates whenever these prolonged legal disputes begin reaching their conclusions.