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Entertainment • Jun 06, 2019

What is #VoxAdpocalypse? YouTube's latest controversy explained

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What is #VoxAdpocalypse? YouTube's latest controversy explained
Steven Crowder - YouTube / YouTube

Following the controversial move of YouTube saying Steven Crowder's attacks against Vox Media journalist Carlos Maza didn't violate Terms of Service, #VoxAdpocalypse began trending as many creators reported that their channels were being demonetized.

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Making your living from YouTube can be pretty tough to do considering how volatile the platform is, and things appear to be getting even harder now following the latest string of controversy.

Maza flagged YouTube to Crowder's channel with a video showcasing all of the times he said racist and homophobic insults directed at him. YouTube went through his channel and deemed that while the videos were inflammatory, they didn't break TOS and were able to remain on the platform.

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The decision sparked outrage from Maza and members of the LGBTQ+ community as they felt YouTube didn't actually care about them, despite YouTube openly celebrating Pride Month.

"I don't know what else LGBT people are supposed to do," Maza quote-tweeted in a reply to YouTube's decision. "I compiled the clips for them. I sent them everything. Publicly begged them to pay attention. It's never enough. Because YouTube does not give a fuck about protecting marginalized people. It never has."

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Who is Steven Crowder?

All of this stems from Crowder's prolonged attack on Maza, and it looks like it could have some serious repercussions for YouTubers all across the platform.

Crowder is a YouTuber with more than 3.8 million subscribers, and he calls himself 'the number one conservative late night comedy show', according to his About section on YouTube.

He maintains that if his channel were to be taken down, you'd have to remove other late-night hosts from YouTube such as Stephen Colbert, a host well-known for his criticisms of President Donald Trump.

While his channel was able to remain on the platform, it was demonetized - but the door is open to get that monetization back.

He says YouTube sent him an email saying the following things violated the monetization guidelines: use of his "Socialism is for f*gs" t-shirt, his 2017 video titled "#204 TRANS TROOP BAN, OH NO!!", and his 2015 video titled "Muslim Rape in UK Exposed by Toni Bugle."

This was revealed by him in his live show held on June 5.

Crowder also said he spoke with YouTube, and deduced another adpocalypse was upon us. This means he believes advertisers will be pulling their ads from YouTube, making it difficult for creators to bring in any revenue.

"Just spoke with YouTube," he tweeted. "Confirmed, the second Adpocalpyse IS here and they're coming for you. More details to follow. Stay tuned.

Drama Alert host Daniel 'KEEMSTAR' Keem says channels have already become demonetized as a result of this situation. Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro called YouTube a 'joke' over what has transpired so far.

"If YouTube is now going to police insulting speech -- not violent speech, not incitement, not actual fake news -- because a virulently censorious, radical activist masquerading as a journalist complains about being insulted, they're a joke."

This will definitely be something to keep an eye on and see how YouTube responds moving forward.

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