Entertainment

Streamer reveals how much he was paid for 2-minute sponsorship

by Jacob Hale
Twitch / Unsplash: Pepi Stojanovski

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An English Twitch streamer has revealed how much he was paid for a short two-minute sponsorship, also known as a bounty, during his Twitch broadcast.

Bounties are paid sponsorship opportunities that Twitch partners can take advantage of, with Twitch handling the relationship between both parties and ensuring partners can find sponsorship opportunities to help grow their stream.

They’re not something often spoken about by popular streamers, but broadcasters of all levels can take them if they’re a partner, and are a good way of making some added income from the platform when still trying to grow.

Twitch
Twitch bounties are paid based on hitting certain criteria, such as in this example from 2018.

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That said, when Nemz38 was asked by a viewer how much he got paid for the bounty to watch a trailer for the new movie Parasite, he was unsure whether he could – or should – share the figure with his stream.

After asking if he could even talk about it, Nemz decided to find a unique way to answer the question without outright saying the number, taking advantage of where he was at in his Dark Souls III stream.

Shortly after saying he’s not allowed to say the number, he asks what he should name his character in the game – eventually settling on ‘$200’ which, while not a real name, definitely gives away an answer to the question he was asked.

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Obviously, his chat found it hilarious, spamming emotes and laughing together in the chat, with some even impressed that he would get paid that much just to show a short video.

Nemz currently has just under 50,000 followers on Twitch at the time of writing which, while impressive, is a long-distance from some of the top streamers, so one can only imagine how much they must get paid for their sponsorship deals.

On Twitch’s Bounty Board Program information page, it is stated that bounty payment amounts are based on both the brand and “historical viewership metrics,” so streamers with the bigger viewership obviously get paid more.