Entertainment

It's a celebration: PewDiePie's "Congratulations" song overtakes Post Malone

by Eli Becht

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Felix 'PewDiePie' Kjellberg's "Congratulations" music video now has more likes than Post Malone's "Congratulations", despite only being out for under a month.

After a prolonged battle with India-based music label and production company T-Series, it looked like all hope was lost for PewDiePie after he looked like he was passed for good.

This led him to release a song that 'congratulated' T-Series, while also throwing all sorts of shade at the same time. Somehow, this video helped PewDiePie not only reclaim the most subscriptions on YouTube, but also take back the top spot by a huge margin.

YouTube: PewDiePie
YouTube: PewDiePie
PewDiePie has fought off T-Series and Post Malone.

PewDiePie's "Congratulations" has proven to be such the hit that it has already surpassed rapper Post Malone's song "Congratulations", in 'likes' on YouTube.

While this is an impressive feat, it's made even more so by the fact that it has been available for a much shorter time than Post Malone's version.

Post Malone's "Congratulations" has over 1 billion views on YouTube and is sitting at 5.5 million likes since its release on Jan 23, 2017.

On the other hand, we have PewDiePie's "Congratulations", released on March 31, 2019, and has over 71 million views but comes in with 5.7 million, topping Post Malone.

Obviously, you can't really judge the quality of a song based on just the amount of likes it has on YouTube but this does prove PewDiePie reaches a large audience and you can never really count him out in the fight against T-Series.

Fans love PewDiePie's "Congratulations" - T-Series doesn't

On April 10 T-Series allegedly looked to file a court order to remove both "Bitch Lasagna" and "Congratulations" from YouTube.

While people might look at PewDiePie's song as some good, clean fun there are numerous allegations he throws out towards T-Series which is likely what the court order stems from.

In "Congratulations" Pewds suggests the Indian music label got its start by using pirated songs and even mentioned T-Series CEO Bhushan Kumar's sexual harassment allegations.