Entertainment

Doug DeMuro claims car companies don’t take YouTube car reviews seriously

by Bill Cooney
Doug DeMuro

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Doug DeMuro is one of the most popular auto YouTubers out there, but he explained in a recent video why content creators like himself can have a harder time getting access to review cars than other forms of media.

DeMuro is known for his reviews and videos on all kinds of cars and automobiles, and currently boasts over 3.2 million subscribers on his main YouTube channel.

As one of the most subscribed car YouTubers on the site, DeMuro seems to have inside access to all the latest rides - but in a recent video, he explained why it can be difficult for content creators to get access to the newest vehiclees

Doug DeMuro/Twitter
Doug DeMuro/Twitter
DeMuro is known for his wild auto-themed videos on YouTube.

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While his video from December 20 is technically about why he hadn't yet reviewed the new Chevrolet C8 Corvette, the YouTuber also talked about why gaining access to new cars for reviews can be a challenge for people like him.

DeMuro claimed  that he contacted individuals from both Chevrolet and General Motors Public Relations, but didn't hear back at all from either company.

"I average 1.1 million video views in a week, which is by far the most per video average of any car YouTuber," Demuro said while explaining his problems in getting a C8 to review. "So, isn't it in the best interest of General Motors to get me a car so it can get a lot of exposure?"

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The answer, he said, is because a lot of auto industry PR insiders don't generally consider YouTubers to be "legitimate journalists."

"Generally speaking, most automakers look at YouTube and see us as influencers," he explained. "Kinda like people on Instagram trying to peddle face cream."

"When a YouTuber reaches out, 'eh this guy's just an influencer, he does stupid stuff,' and I don't even get an email back," DeMuro continued. "When a magazine reaches out, the automaker PR person has done business with that magazine for a while. ...they have an existing relationship."

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DeMuro went on to say that a lot of PR workers in the auto industry see YouTube as a place for "kids and entertainment," not where serious shoppers go to find out information before making a purchase - which isn't accurate, in the slightest.

He goes into more detail about why automakers don't seem to take car YouTubers seriously in his video, and reassured fans he would have a review for the C8 up, as soon as it hits dealerships.