DJWheat explains reasoning behind Twitch's most notable bannings - Dexerto
Entertainment

DJWheat explains reasoning behind Twitch’s most notable bannings

Published: 10/Apr/2019 23:52 Updated: 16/Apr/2020 16:29

by Virginia Glaze

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As one of the most popular online streaming platforms, Twitch has seen its fair share of issues in regards to offensive content and censorship – which Twitch exec djWHEAT explained during an episode of the Dexerto Talk Show on April 8.

Twitch has undergone scrutiny for its handling of problematic situations that inevitably arise during live streams, such as the banning of one streamer for using the term “mongoloid” when he didn’t understand the word’s offensive connotation.

While the streamer later spoke out on the issue to clarify his lack of knowledge on the term, he was still banned for a 30-day period, inciting outrage from users across the internet.

Twitch’s widespread moderation

Twitch’s Director of Creator Development, Marcus ‘djWheat’ Graham, addressed the issue in a conversation with Esports caster Richard Lewis, who brought up several of the platform’s more notable controversies – including streamer Hasan Piker’s ban for showing a documentary of the tragic Columbine shooting during a broadcast in early February.

“You can’t have robots doing it all, and also when you bring the humans into it… I totally appreciate that it is probably one of the most difficult things that any company on the internet [can do],” djWHEAT said of moderation on the platform. “Moderation on a mass scale is ridiculous.”

[Timestamp: 36:45 for mobile viewers]

Making transparency a priority

djWHEAT himself is an outspoken proponent for increased transparency on the site, stating that it could drastically improve relations with its community in regards to issues such as confusing bans.

“I personally would love to see more transparency,” he continued. “ I think transparency is the one thing that will get a community to at least be like, ‘Oh, okay, well you gave us a reason so we’re not making one up.’ Even if the reason is not the greatest.”

Misayi, TwitterdjWHEAT serves as Twitch’s Director of Creator Development, and has a storied history in bringing esports to the forefront of modern entertainment.https://twitter.com/misayi/status/648892229323362305

Lewis likewise questioned djWHEAT on some users’ theories that moderators have an “inherent bias” toward high-profile streamers on the platform, such as Greekgodx’s take on why Alinity has managed to stay on the site – despite her multiple slip-ups.

“I won’t say it was the lack of a system, but I will say that this is where I feel like transparency is king,” djWHEAT said of the issue – specifically referring to Piker’s ban. “…That process is something that will probably still take years and years and years to build, and can it really be perfected anyway?

While it’s likely that no system of enforcing rules on Twitch will ever be perfect, djWHEAT has assured viewers that they are striving for that goal, and ultimately seek to find an appropriate balance in the process.

Entertainment

Why Olivia Rodrigo’s song ‘Drivers License’ went viral on TikTok: a timeline

Published: 22/Jan/2021 16:26

by Georgina Smith

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Star of Disney channel’s High School Musical series Olivia Rodrigo has taken TikTok by storm with her new hit ‘Driver’s License,’ with many fans speculating that it was written about co-star Joshua Bassett, and fan theories going viral. Here’s everything that’s happened so far.

17-year-old Olivia Rodrigo is a singer and actress who first made her Disney channel debut with the show Bizaardvark, and then later went on to star in a leading role as part of High School Musical: The Musical: The Series.

Avid TikTok users may recognize her voice from the song ‘All I Want’ that she wrote for the High School Musical series. The song went unexpectedly viral on the app, with many shocked that the beautiful track had originated from a Disney show.

In her debut single ‘Drivers License’ Olivia flexes her insane voice and songwriting talent yet again. But many fans have theorized that the song could be about co-star Joshua Bassett, and it has got people on TikTok making theory videos matching up lyrics of the songs with aspects of her real life, boosting the song’s virality even more.

But how exactly did ‘Driver’s License’ become so viral, and what has happened since the song took off? Here’s everything you need to know.

February 2019 – Olivia Rodrigo and Joshua Bassett become co-stars

In February 2019, production began for Disney Channel’s High School Musical: The Musical: The Series, which follows a group of students who put on a production of High School Musical for their school production.

Olivia starred as Nini, who in the show is cast as main female lead Gabriella Montez from the original HSM, and Joshua starred as Ricky, who gets cast as the main male lead, and Gabriella’s love interest, Troy Bolton. The show was also renewed for a second season.

Olivia Rodrigo and Joshua Bassett sing in HSM the series
YouTube: Disney Music Vevo, Chorus Boy, Salty Pictures
Olivia and Joshua played the leading roles, and love interests, in High School Musical: the Musical: the Series

August 2020 – Olivia Rodrigo hints at a potential breakup

The star was originally asked to write the song ‘All I Want’ for the Disney series, but it found an unexpectedly warm reception on TikTok especially, with countless people using the sound for their own emotional TikToks, surprised to learn that it was part of the soundtrack for a High School Musical series.

Olivia posted her own TikTok with the song in the background, with the in-video caption, “you think you can hurt my feelings? I wrote this song.” In the description beneath the video she wrote, “and that’s on failed relationships,” which led some to believe she had experienced a breakup – though it was unclear who she could have broken up with.

January 8, 2021 – Olivia releases debut single ‘Driver’s License’

Fans of ‘All I Want’ were thrilled when they found out that Olivia would be releasing her debut single, and it’s safe to say people loved the bittersweet lyrics and stunning arrangement of ‘Drivers License’ when it was released on January 8.

On January 9, not long after release, ‘Drivers License’ had ascended to number one on the US iTunes sales charts, a testament to the love the song was getting from her fans, and TikTok users alike.

January 9, 2021 – Theories about the song go viral on TikTok

It didn’t take long for TikTok users to get invested in the emotional meaning behind the song, and many took note of some distinctive lyrics that seemed to match up with events in real life, implying that Joshua was the one who could have prompted the emotional song.

User morganvybihal highlighted some potential ‘easter eggs’ in Olivia’s new music video. She appeared to be wearing a denim borg jacket very similar to one that Joshua wore in the HSM series.

@morganvybihal

#oliviarodrigo dropping easter eggs like Taylor ? lol #greenscreen #tea

♬ Drivers License by Olivia Rodrigo – nickie j

They also pulled up an image of Olivia playing a keyboard from the show, matching it up with a scene in the music video that shows her playing a toy piano on the floor, adding to the references that could tie this song to the series in some way.

Another user posted a video in which Olivia recalls her first time driving with Joshua because she didn’t have her permit. The TikTok then plays a short clip of the song in which the star sings “I got my driver’s license last week,” and mentions how they always used to talk about it.

Perhaps most significantly, many suspect that the “blonde girl” Olivia refers to could actually be singer and actress Sabrina Carpenter, as the pair have seemingly got closer lately.

Olivia herself has not confirmed whether the song is about Joshua or not, and seems she just wants to enjoy the success of her new song without directing hate toward any party rumored to be involved. But it’s safe to say that fans are hugely invested in the song and its meaning.

January 10, 2021 – Taylor Swift praises Olivia Rodrigo

Olivia has made no secret of her love for singer Taylor Swift, occasionally posting about her on her Instagram account, and she couldn’t believe her eyes when she saw that Taylor herself had commented on her post about ‘Drivers License’ being next to the popular singer on the iTunes charts.

Taylor wrote, “I say that’s my baby and I’m really proud,” leaving fans (and of course Olivia) delighted that the pair had a chance to interact.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Olivia Rodrigo (@olivia.rodrigo)

January 22, 2021 – Sabrina Carpenter releases song ‘Skin’

The attention toward Olivia Rodrigo has amped up again after Sabrina Carpenter, the girl that many fans assumed was the “blonde girl” mentioned in Drivers License, released a song of her own.

Her song is titled ‘Skin,’ and listeners noticed some lines in the song that may indicate that it’s a response to Olivia’s insanely popular track.

Sabrina sings, “maybe you didn’t mean it, maybe “blonde” was the only rhyme,” in a potential reference to the iconic “you’re probably with that blonde girl,” line from Olivia’s own song.

In the bridge, Carpenter also sings, “don’t drive yourself insane,” which many also took to be a reference to the theme of driving in the original song.

She has not confirmed that the song is actually about Olivia, but many fans seem to believe it is. Some have said they think the song was written to hit out at the young star, but others actually think that the lyrics taking Olivia’s side against haters, and those prying into their personal lives.

 

Regardless of the intention, the new release has brought attention to the situation again, with countless TikToks going viral for reactions and memes about the exchange.


‘Drivers License’ has quite literally become an overnight sensation, racking up over 9 million views within the space of just a few days. While Olivia hasn’t confirmed who the song is really about — if it’s even about anyone in particular — the song is still proving to be a huge hit for its heartfelt lyrics.