Entertainment

DansGaming reveals depressing cost of being a full time Twitch streamer

by Virginia Glaze

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Thanks to the ever-growing popularity of sites like Twitch and YouTube, more and more internet users fantasize about a full-time career being a streamer or vlogger – but these careers can come with a hefty price.

While viral videos can seemingly skyrocket YouTubers to fame, being internet famous takes a lot of work behind the scenes, with streamers grinding day after day to build their audience over time.

In fact, Twitch streamer “DansGaming” claims that his rise to Twitch stardom cost him all of his social relationships, as he’s had to dedicate 100% of his time to building his channel.

DansGaming, Instagram
DansGaming, Instagram
DansGaming revealed the isolation that comes with being a top Twitch streamer.

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Dan argued that his current loneliness is the result of “sacrifices” he made to climb his way to the top, admitting that he is heavily isolated from the outside world.

“I lost all of my connections to people,” he explained. “I’m just very lonely a lot. It’s sad, but that’s just how it is. You gotta make a lot of sacrifices, and if you’re not already in a relationship before you start streaming or during streaming, then it’s really hard to find someone new when you haven’t been outside in a very long time.”

With over 790,000 followers on Twitch, it makes sense that Dan’s hard work and dedication to the craft could result in severe isolation – and he’s not alone in his feelings.

Streamer “Gross Gore” had a recent breakdown during a broadcast on October 17, where he admitted that a group Twitch trolls were “destroying” his mental health, claiming that his stream could “go down the drain” rather than deal with the spammers.

While Gross Gore’s ensuing spiel contained sensitive language, his point was made blatantly clear – and it’s an issue that seems to be affecting many streamers and internet personalities, at large, with even the likes of Imane “Pokimane” Anys breaking down into tears after receiving online hate in July.

With streaming becoming a more prominent profession, issues of mental health and isolation are similarly increasing – and while some streamers, like “Maximilian Dood,” broadcast in groups, not everyone is afforded that luxury.