TACO Lists Three Key Reasons Why He Believes CS:GO Majors Have Lost Their Prestige - Dexerto
CS:GO

TACO Lists Three Key Reasons Why He Believes CS:GO Majors Have Lost Their Prestige

Published: 11/Jul/2018 16:22 Updated: 26/Jul/2018 12:06

by Ross Deason

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Team Liquid’s Epitácio ‘TACO’ de Melo believes that Valve’s Counter-Strike: Global Offensive Majors are losing some of their prestige.

The two-time Major Champion has been critical of recent Majors in a Twitter post, arguing against the switch to the Swiss system format that has replaced the old GSL-style groups. He also complained about the roster lock rules and the decision to include stickers for teams competing in what used to be the “Major Qualifier” stage.

The GSL-style groups that were used in previous Majors would feature a double elimination pools of four teams, with best-of-three elimination and decider matches.

The Swiss system, which has been favored more recently, sees teams always playing against other teams with the same record (1-1 teams play each other, 0-2 teams play each other etc.) until they have three wins or three losses.

The major complaint with this system is that it doesn’t use seeded draws for each round and can often result in runs for some teams that appear to be significantly more difficult or easy depending on the randomness of the draw.

There has also been criticism about the lack of best-of-three matches in the Swiss System due to time constraints. Some members of the community, like MLG’s Adam Apicella, stating that using side stations and streams with best-of-three games are preferable to best-of-ones all on a single main stream.

As for decision to extend Majors by ditching the old Major Qualifier in favour of the New Challengers Stage means that eight more teams earn stickers than they did previously.

Teams that qualify for a Valve sponsored Major get to have stickers with their logo added to the game along with a share of the proceeds from their sale; the same applies to individual player signature stickers.

A number of professional players, including MiBR’s Jake ‘Stewie2K’ Yip, have pointed out that giving more teams stickers takes away some of the prestige away from having them in-game, because teams used to have to play their way into the Major and couldn’t qualify directly from the regional minors.

As for the roster locks, there have been numerous examples of top teams having to use stand-ins for Major tournaments due to these occurring so early in the qualification stages.

Team Liquid, for instance, were forced to play with their coach Wilton ‘Zews’ Prado at the ELEAGUE Boston Major in January. SK Gaming, on the other hand, had to resort to bringing back the benched João ‘felps’ Vasconcellos for the same event.

The Majors are still the biggest events in all of Counter-Strike, but TACO is clearly concerned that they are falling behind other premier events and could continue to do so if things don’t change soon.

CS:GO

Newly added CSGO Source 2 code has players hopeful for major update soon

Published: 23/Oct/2020 4:29

by Andrew Amos

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CS:GO players ⁠— it’s time to get your hopes up again. New strings of Source 2 code have been found in a recent Artifact update, and it’s got everyone hopeful that a major update is just around the corner.

Source 2 is coming to CS:GO. Or is it? At this point, the project has been greenlit, then reportedly canceled, then put back on so many times it’s hard to keep track.

CS:GO’s port to the newer Source 2 engine seemed dead in the water in July, even after speculation earlier in 2020 that it was just around the corner. Now it’s been given a new timeframe of the end of 2021.

However, for the first time in almost six months, there’s physical evidence that Valve are still kicking along with the project. New code found in one of Valve’s other titles has given players hope for Source 2 ⁠— and potentially a major update in the coming weeks.

The CS:GO Source 2 code string was found in the latest Artifact update. Valve data miner ‘GabeFollower’ shared the details on October 22. It was just a one-liner to do with shadows, but to CS:GO players, it’s something.

Given there hasn’t been any major changes to CS:GO since 2019’s Operation Shattered Web, any news is good news. However, it’s unlikely one string of Source 2 code is going to spell out a major in-game event.

It also doesn’t give players a better understanding of exactly what Source 2 will do for CS:GO.

According to Tyler McVickers of Valve News Network, Source 2 isn’t going to impact players too much. In fact, he stated that the game would be “95%” the same after the port.

“Source 2 still retains that backwards compatibility to Source 1, meaning even if a lot of the core mechanics change, ever so slightly, and upset the competitive side, the casual side — expecting ‘CSGO remade’ — will be disappointed as well,” he told players back in July.

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FMPONE, Twitter
Source 2 won’t really have an effect on players, according to VNN.

However, there will be some changes to how maps and models are created, as well as some bug fixes that come with fixing the old engine.

Dota 2 is already on Source 2, while elements of CS:GO like the Panorama UI use the newer engine. We will update you on everything Source 2 as new information arises.