Call of duty

Modern Warfare developer responds to more accusations of censorship

by Connor Bennett

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Infinity Ward has addressed concerns that the campaign for Call of Duty fans across the world are chomping at the bit to get any sort of news ahead of the highly-anticipated release of Modern Warfare on October 25. Plenty of the multiplayer portion has already been shown off, but attention has since turned back to the single-player.

The developers are, reportedly, set for a showcase at Gamescom in Koln, Germany in August, but plenty of questions have been asked about its graphic nature. All early details have suggested that it will be more controversial than Modern Warfare 2’s No Russian mission which saw the game banned or toned down in certain countries.

Infinity Ward
Infinity Ward
Modern Warfare is set to revolve around realistic themes with terrorism already have been shown off.

Following the recent mass shootings in the United States, where video game violence has predictably come under the microscope again, fans have asked questions about whether or not Modern Warfare will be toned down.

Infinity Ward Studio Narrative Director Taylor Kurosaki, again, stepped up to take those questions head-on. Responding to one fan on Twitter, who asked if the brutality has been removed, he stated: “Nope. Not right.”

He doubled down on those claims when another fan asked if was necessary to tone down Modern Warfare to get a suitable rating. “Nope,” Kurosaki simply stated again.

Prior to Kurosaki’s tweets, it had been revealed that part of the campaign had been removed. Back in June, Kotaku reported that at least one dialogue portion had been left on the cutting room floor.

Kotaku also noted that the developers were still weighing up just how controversial to get with the single-player action - especially considering the realism aspect that Infinity Ward has already tried to sell. 

It’s not of the question that further parts of the story could be removed in the future, especially if further questions are asked about video games by the United States government.

Until that point, though, Call of Duty fans should get Modern Warfare’s campaign in its current, seemingly controversial state.