Call of Duty

Clayster claims some CoD pros don’t “play to win” in Call of Duty League

Published: 5/Sep/2020 12:11

by Calum Patterson

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Hot off his victory at the CDL Championship Weekend, now-former Dallas Empire star James ‘Clayster’ Eubanks has suggested that some top professional players are no longer playing to win, and instead just to collect a paycheck.

Now a three-time world champion, joining the very exclusive 3-rings club with Ian ‘Crimsix’ Porter and Damon ‘Karma’ Barlow, the trio appeared on the TrainwrecksTV Twitch podcast to discuss the current landscape of CoD esports.

This was the first season of the new franchised league for Call of Duty, and Clayster believes that “inflated” salaries and limited roster spots is changing the approach players have.

Dallas Empire CDL Clayster
Call of Duty League
Clayster is currently without a team, now a restricted free agent with Dallas Empire.

For next season, the league is reverting rosters to 4v4, rather than 5v5, after two years of the new team sizes. This had a very direct impact on Clayster, who was axed from the Empire lineup almost immediately after winning the world championship.

With roster spots now becoming even more limited, Clayster thinks it has put pressure on players to play for themselves, rather than the team. “Everyone is keeping their job now, so they don’t get dropped or maintain a roster spot,” Clayster explains.

“[It’s] just because our salaries are so large right now, and so inflated, that everyone doesn’t need to win to pay rent. They’re just like, ‘f**k it, I need a roster spot’, so I’ll just ‘killwhore’ and ‘statwhore’, put up a 2.0 K/D but literally lose my team the game.’ ”

Devin Nash suggests that a similar trend has been spotted in LCS – North American League of Legends – which is also a franchised league, and for the same reason.

Clayster thinks that this is why so many young and hungry players got their shot in the 2020 season, who otherwise wouldn’t have. “That’s why this year, you saw a bunch of amateur Call of Duty players come up, who have never even been considered before.”

“These kids actually came in trying to win, and get better, and win tournaments. Not just sit there on a bench or on a roster spot and take salary every month, and be like ‘playing with my friends, cool.'”

Clayster is now on the hunt for a roster spot of his own, following his exit from Dallas Empire. The Call of Duty Rostermania season is now starting, and major changes have already taken place. Seattle Surge dropped their entire roster except for one player, for example.

You can keep up with all the moves in rostermania with our dedicated transfers hub.

Call of Duty

Best Warzone weapons to replace the DMR after nerf

Published: 7/Jan/2021 16:48

by Jacob Hale

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The DMR 14 has received a nerf in Warzone with the January 6 patch and, given how strong it still is, we might see yet another nerf. So which weapons should you be leveling up so you don’t miss a beat?

The DMR has become arguably one of the most overpowered weapons in Call of Duty history, which definitely sets it alongside some elite competition.

In most Warzone lobbies now, you’ll be hard pushed to find a squad not using the DMR, which is also often paired with the Mac-10 SMG to capitalize on engagements at any range.

But they’ve already nerfed the tactical rifle once, and will likely do it again, so here’s the weapons we think you could look to to replace the DMR when the time comes.

Type 63

Type 63 Black Ops Cold War DMR
Activision
Think of the Type 63 as the DMR’s slightly less aggressive younger brother.

The obvious choice, the Type 63 is another single-fire, tactical rifle from Black Ops Cold War, which isn’t quite as strong as the DMR but still packs a punch.

Make a Type 63 loadout that maximizes velocity, recoil control, rate of fire, and you’ve essentially got yourself the DMR 2.0. This deadly AR received a nerf alongside the DMR, but it wasn’t hit as hard. Despite the nerfs, it’s still a very powerful weapon and one you’ll want to utilize.

Krig 6

At first, the Black Ops Cold War assault rifles didn’t quite look up to par with their Modern Warfare counterparts, but with some slight adjustments, they are more viable than ever before. This is especially true with the changes made to the Agency Suppressor, which brought it more in line with the Monolithic Suppressor on MW weapons.

It won’t be quite as powerful as the DMR or the Type 63, but will offer a full-auto alternative that is arguably much more satisfying to play with in Verdansk.

SP-R 208

Warzone sp-r 208
Activision
The SPR is great for players looking to mix sniping ability with more mobility.

If you’re looking for a marksman rifle that can replicate the strength and range of the DMR, the SPR is a great sniper for it.

It has a higher rate of fire than other sniper rifles, as is expected from a marksman rifle, and shouldn’t leave too many hitmarkers providing you maintain a decent level of accuracy. You won’t be able to spam it like the DMR or Krig, but as long as you hit your shots, it can take down enemies at most ranges with relative ease.

Kilo 141

Of course, one likely scenario, once the DMR is nerfed again, is that the Kilo 141 becomes the main assault rifle to run again.

While the Kilo/R9 meta started to become stale prior to Season 1, it was arguably not as frustrating as the current DMR meta, so expect to see the MW assault rifle crop up far more in the coming weeks.

Grau

Grau modern warfare warzone
Activision
The Grau was a popular weapon in Modern Warfare, and can still do some decent damage now.

Remember the Grau assault rifle? It was the go-to in the early days of Warzone and, while it has lost popularity over time, remains a perfectly viable weapon when the DMR isn’t in play.

With the right loadout, the Grau hardly has any recoil, and a nice iron sight means you don’t even need to tack on an optic, giving you the option to add more attachments elsewhere. It might not be perfect, but it definitely opens you to more options as far as attachments and playstyles go.

So, those are the weapons we think will replace the DMR after its inevitable nerf, which is likely to be far more impactful than the minor one it received on January 6.

There are other guns that could work, such as the M4A1 assault rifle and Kar98k marksman rifle, but in our eyes, they’re not quite of the same caliber as those above.