Call of Duty

Censor hits back after NY Subliners teammate Temp calls him “trash”

by Jacob Hale

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New York Subliners substitute Doug ‘Censor’ Martin has hit back at teammate Donovan ‘Temp’ Laroda, who called him “trash” after picking alternate sub Nick ‘Happy’ Suda to take a starting roster place.

Despite his hard work throughout the Modern Warfare season so far, Censor has failed to pick up a starting role on the team, even though Trei ‘Zer0’ Morris was recently benched after a string of underwhelming results.

Censor explained during a stream that the team – but predominantly Temp – wanted Happy to take Zer0’s spot, and that Temp even called him trash when discussions were ongoing.

Twitter: Censor
The heat seems to be picking up between these two.

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Then, in a series of pro 10s matches, Censor and Temp found themselves on opposing teams – and Doug was relishing in the opportunity to prove his teammate wrong.

After getting a kill on Temp, Doug simply says “you f**king suck, dude,” already showing his anger at his teammate and the situation.

Then, after a successful map of Gun Runner hardpoint, Doug finished top of the leaderboards with 7000 score – and lets Temp know exactly what he thinks.

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“Let’s go, dude,” he says. “Don’t ever f**king say I’m trash, bro,” an impassioned Censor calls out, clearly angling towards his New York teammate.

He continues: “I grind this game way too much to hear that bulls**t. I play way too much of this game for people to call me trash. Let me see you put up 7000 score doing the objective. Let me see what you can do, Don.”

He makes no secret that he’s speaking directly to Temp, who will have been forced to bite his tongue after taking the loss in the map.

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The drama surrounding Censor and his team continues to unfurl after he and his Dad were forced to apologize for an Instagram post slamming each of his teammates.

Whether any of this is going to affect either Temp or Censor's standing with the Subliners organization remains to be seen, as there haven't been any public spats between teammates since the launch of the Call of Duty League. If anything comes from this, it may set a precedent for how players and teams deal with issues in the future.